Darwiniana; Essays and Reviews Pertaining to Darwinism eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 317 pages of information about Darwiniana; Essays and Reviews Pertaining to Darwinism.

III-9.  Vide North American Review, for April, 1860, p. 475, and Christian Examiner, for May, p. 457.

III-10.  Page 188, English edition.

III-11.  In American Journal of Science, July, 1860, pp. 147—­149.

III-12.  In “Contributions to the Natural History of the United States,” vol. i., p.128, 129.

III-13.  Contributions to the Natural History of the United States,” vol. 1, p. 130; and American Journal of Science, July, 1860, p. 143.

III-14.  North American Review for April 1860, p. 506.

III-15.  Vide motto from Butler, prefixed to the second edition of Darwin’s work.

III-16.  North American Review, loc. cit., p. 504.

III-17.  North American Review, loc. cit., p. 487, et passim.

III-18.  In American Journal of Science, July, 1860, p. 143.

III-19.  Vide article by Mr. C. Wright, in the Mathematical Monthly for May last.

III-20.  Vide Edinburgh Review for January, 1860, article on
“Acclimatization,” etc.

III-21.  American Journal of Science, July, 1860, p. 146.

IV-1.  A name which, at the close of his article, De Candolle proposes for the study of the succession of organized beings, to comprehend, therefore, palaeontology and all included under what is called geographical botany and zoology—­the whole forming a science parallel to geology—­the latter devoted to the history of unorganized bodies, the former, to that of organized beings, as respects origin, distribution, and succession.  We are not satisfied with the word, notwithstanding the precedent of palaeontology; since ontology, the Science of being, has an established meaning as referring to mental existence—­i.e., is a synonym for a department of metaphysics.

IV-2.  Natural History Review, January, 1862

IV-3.  What the Rev. Principal Tulloch remarks in respect to the philosophy of miracles has a pertinent application here.  We quote at second hand: 

“The stoutest advocates of interference can mean nothing more than that the Supreme Will has so moved the hidden springs of Nature that a new issue arises on given circumstances.  The ordinary issue is supplanted by a higher issue.  The essential facts before us are a certain set of phenomena, and a Higher Will moving them.  How moving them? is a question for human definition; the answer to which does not and cannot affect the divine meaning of the change.  Yet when we reflect that this Higher Will is every. where reason and wisdom, it seems a juster as well as a more comprehensive view to regard it as operating by subordination and evolution, rather than by interference or violation.”

IV-4.  Particularly citing Flourens:  “La ressemblance n’est qu’une condition secondaire; la condition essentielle est la descendance:  ce n’est pas la ressemblance, c’est la succession des individus, qui fait l’espece.”

V-1.  The phrase “Atlantic United States” is here used throughout in contradistinction to Pacific United States:  to the former of course belong, botanically and geographically, the valley of the Mississippi and its tributaries up to the eastern border of the great woodless plains, which constitute an intermediate region.

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