Ann Veronica, a modern love story eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 375 pages of information about Ann Veronica, a modern love story.

Slowly and reluctantly she came to realize that Vivie Warren was what is called an “ideal.”  There were no such girls and no such positions.  No work that offered was at all of the quality she had vaguely postulated for herself.  With such qualifications as she possessed, two chief channels of employment lay open, and neither attracted her, neither seemed really to offer a conclusive escape from that subjection to mankind against which, in the person of her father, she was rebelling.  One main avenue was for her to become a sort of salaried accessory wife or mother, to be a governess or an assistant schoolmistress, or a very high type of governess-nurse.  The other was to go into business—­into a photographer’s reception-room, for example, or a costumer’s or hat-shop.  The first set of occupations seemed to her to be altogether too domestic and restricted; for the latter she was dreadfully handicapped by her want of experience.  And also she didn’t like them.  She didn’t like the shops, she didn’t like the other women’s faces; she thought the smirking men in frock-coats who dominated these establishments the most intolerable persons she had ever had to face.  One called her very distinctly “My dear!”

Two secretarial posts did indeed seem to offer themselves in which, at least, there was no specific exclusion of womanhood; one was under a Radical Member of Parliament, and the other under a Harley Street doctor, and both men declined her proffered services with the utmost civility and admiration and terror.  There was also a curious interview at a big hotel with a middle-aged, white-powdered woman, all covered with jewels and reeking of scent, who wanted a Companion.  She did not think Ann Veronica would do as her companion.

And nearly all these things were fearfully ill-paid.  They carried no more than bare subsistence wages; and they demanded all her time and energy.  She had heard of women journalists, women writers, and so forth; but she was not even admitted to the presence of the editors she demanded to see, and by no means sure that if she had been she could have done any work they might have given her.  One day she desisted from her search and went unexpectedly to the Tredgold College.  Her place was not filled; she had been simply noted as absent, and she did a comforting day of admirable dissection upon the tortoise.  She was so interested, and this was such a relief from the trudging anxiety of her search for work, that she went on for a whole week as if she was still living at home.  Then a third secretarial opening occurred and renewed her hopes again:  a position as amanuensis—­with which some of the lighter duties of a nurse were combined—­to an infirm gentleman of means living at Twickenham, and engaged upon a great literary research to prove that the “Faery Queen” was really a treatise upon molecular chemistry written in a peculiar and picturesquely handled cipher.

Part 2

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Ann Veronica, a modern love story from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook