Tales eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 238 pages of information about Tales.
You see him valiant now, he scorns to heed
The bigot’s threat’nings or the zealot’s creed;
Shook by a dream, he next for truth receives
What frenzy teaches, and what fear believes;
And this will place him in the power of one
Whom we must seek, because we cannot shun.” 
   Wisp had been ostler at a busy inn,
Where he beheld and grew in dread of sin;
Then to a Baptists’ meeting found his way,
Became a convert, and was taught to pray;
Then preach’d; and, being earnest and sincere,
Brought other sinners to religious fear: 
Together grew his influence and his fame,
Till our dejected hero heard his name: 
His little failings were a grain of pride,
Raised by the numbers he presumed to guide;
A love of presents, and of lofty praise
For his meek spirit and his humble ways;
But though this spirit would on flattery feed,
No praise could blind him and no arts mislead:  —
To him the Doctor made the wishes known
Of his good patron, but conceal’d his own;
He of all teachers had distrust and doubt,
And was reserved in what he came about;
Though on a plain and simple message sent,
He had a secret and a bold intent: 
Their minds at first were deeply veil’d; disguise
Form’d the slow speech, and oped the eager eyes;
Till by degrees sufficient light was thrown
On every view, and all the business shown. 
Wisp, as a skilful guide who led the blind,
Had powers to rule and awe the vapourish mind;
But not the changeful will, the wavering fear to bind: 
And should his conscience give him leave to dwell
With Gwyn, and every rival power expel
(A dubious point), yet he, with every care,
Might soon the lot of the rejected share;
And other Wisps he found like him to reign,
And then be thrown upon the world again: 
He thought it prudent then, and felt it just,
The present guides of his new friend to trust: 
True, he conceived, to touch the harder heart
Of the cool Doctor, was beyond his art;
But mild Rebecca he could surely sway,
While Gwyn would follow where she led the way: 
So to do good, (and why a duty shun,
Because rewarded for the good when done?)
He with his friends would join in all they plann’d,
Save when his faith or feelings should withstand;
There he must rest sole judge of his affairs,
While they might rule exclusively in theirs. 
   When Gwyn his message to the teacher sent,
He fear’d his friends would show their discontent;
And prudent seem’d it to th’ attendant pair,
Not all at once to show an aspect fair: 
On Wisp they seem’d to look with jealous eye,
And fair Rebecca was demure and shy;
But by degrees the teacher’s worth they knew,
And were so kind, they seem’d converted too. 
   Wisp took occasion to the nymph to say,
“You must be married:  will you name the day?”
She smiled,—­“’Tis well:  but should he not comply,
Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Tales from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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