Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 238 pages of information about Tales.
And felt his consequence, and dwelt in peace. 
   Our Hero’s age was threescore years and five,
When he exclaim’d, “Why longer should I strive? 
Why more amass, who never must behold
A young John Dighton to make glad the old?”
(The sons he had to early graves were gone,
And girls were burdens to the mind of John.)
“Had I a boy, he would our name sustain,
That now to nothing must return again;
But what are all my profits, credit, trade,
And parish honours?—­folly and parade.” 
   Thus Dighton thought, and in his looks appeared
Sadness, increased by much he saw and heard;
The Brethren often at the shop would stay,
And make their comments ere they walk’d away;
They mark’d the window, fill’d in every pane
With lawless prints of reputations slain;
Distorted forms of men with honours graced,
And our chief rulers in dirision placed: 
Amazed they stood, remembering well the days
When to be humble was their brother’s praise;
When at the dwelling of their friend they stopped;
To drop a word, or to receive it dropp’d;
Where they beheld the prints of men renown’d,
And far-famed preachers pasted all around,
(Such mouths! eyes! hair! so prim! so fierce! so sleek! 
They look’d as speaking what is woe to speak): 
On these the passing brethren loved to dwell —
How long they spake! how strongly! warmly! well! 
What power had each to dive in mysteries deep,
To warm the cold, to make the harden’d weep;
To lure, to fright, to soothe, to awe the soul,
And listening locks to lead and to control! 
   But now discoursing, as they linger’d near,
They tempted John (whom they accused) to hear
Their weighty charge—­“And can the lost one feel,
As in the time of duty, love, and zeal;
When all were summon’d at the rising sun,
And he was ready with his friends to run;
When he, partaking with a chosen few,
Felt the great change, sensation rich and new? 
No! all is lost; her favours Fortune shower’d
Upon the man, and he is overpower’d;
The world has won him with its tempting store
Of needless wealth, and that has made him poor: 
Success undoes him; he has risen to fall,
Has gain’d a fortune, and has lost his all;
Gone back from Sion, he will find his age
Loth to commence a second pilgrimage;
He has retreated from the chosen track,
And now must ever bear the burden on his back.” 
   Hurt by such censure, John began to find
Fresh revolutions working in his mind;
He sought for comfort in his books, but read
Without a plan or method in his head;
What once amused, now rather made him sad;
What should inform, increased the doubts he had;
Shame would not let him seek at Church a guide,
And from his Meeting he was held by pride;
His wife derided fears she never felt,
And passing brethren daily censures dealt;
Hope for a son was now for ever past,
Follow Us on Facebook