The Old English Baron: a Gothic Story eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 169 pages of information about The Old English Baron.

Title:  The Old English Baron

Author:  Clara Reeve

Release Date:  February, 2004 [EBook #5182] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on May 31, 2002]

Edition:  10

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

*** Start of the project gutenberg EBOOK, the old English baron ***

This eBook was prepared by Jack Voller.

The Old English Baron by Clara Reeve

PREFACE

As this Story is of a species which, though not new, is out of the common track, it has been thought necessary to point out some circumstances to the reader, which will elucidate the design, and, it is hoped, will induce him to form a favourable, as well as a right judgment of the work before him.

This Story is the literary offspring of The Castle of Otranto, written upon the same plan, with a design to unite the most attractive and interesting circumstances of the ancient Romance and modern Novel, at the same time it assumes a character and manner of its own, that differs from both; it is distinguished by the appellation of a Gothic Story, being a picture of Gothic times and manners.  Fictitious stories have been the delight of all times and all countries, by oral tradition in barbarous, by writing in more civilized ones; and although some persons of wit and learning have condemned them indiscriminately, I would venture to affirm, that even those who so much affect to despise them under one form, will receive and embrace them under another.

Thus, for instance, a man shall admire and almost adore the Epic poems of the Ancients, and yet despise and execrate the ancient Romances, which are only Epics in prose.

History represents human nature as it is in real life, alas, too often a melancholy retrospect!  Romance displays only the amiable side of the picture; it shews the pleasing features, and throws a veil over the blemishes:  Mankind are naturally pleased with what gratifies their vanity; and vanity, like all other passions of the human heart, may be rendered subservient to good and useful purposes.

I confess that it may be abused, and become an instrument to corrupt the manners and morals of mankind; so may poetry, so may plays, so may every kind of composition; but that will prove nothing more than the old saying lately revived by the philosophers the most in fashion, “that every earthly thing has two handles.”

The business of Romance is, first, to excite the attention; and secondly, to direct it to some useful, or at least innocent, end:  Happy the writer who attains both these points, like Richardson! and not unfortunate, or undeserving praise, he who gains only the latter, and furnishes out an entertainment for the reader!

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Old English Baron: a Gothic Story from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook