Beechcroft at Rockstone eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 360 pages of information about Beechcroft at Rockstone.

She tried to clear her perceptions by explanations to him, but he did not seem to give his mind to the grammar half as much as to the cessation of the lessons and her absence.

‘You must do the best you can,’ she said, ’and I shall find you gone quite beyond me.’

‘I shall never do that, Miss Merrifield.’

‘Nonsense!’ she said, laughing uncomfortably ’a pretty clergyman you would be if you could not pass a girl.  There! good-bye.  Make a list of your puzzles and I will do my best with them when I come back.’

‘Thank you,’ and he wrung her hand with an earnestness that gave her a sense of uneasiness.

CHAPTER XI.  LADY MERRIFIELD’S CHRISTMAS LETTER-BAG

(PRIMROSE.)

’MY DEAR MAMMA—–­I wish you a merry Christmas, and papa and sisters and Claude too.  I only hooped once to-day, and Nurse says I may go out when it gets fine.  Fly is better.  She sent me her dolls’ house in a big box in a cart, and Mysie sent a new frock of her own making for Liliana, and Uncle William gave me a lovely doll, with waxen arms and legs, that shuts her eyes and squeals, and says Mamma; but I do not want anything but my own dear mamma, and all the rest.  I am mamma’s own little PRIMROSE.’

(FERGUS.)

’COALHAM.  ’MY DEAR MAMMA—–­I wish you and papa, and all, a happy Crismas, and I send a plan of the great coal mine for a card.  It is much jollier here than at Rockquay, for it is all black with cinders, and there are little fires all night, and there are lots of oars and oxhide and fossils and ferns and real curiozitys, and nobody minds noises nor muddy boots, and they aren’t at one to wash your hands, for they can’t be clean ever; and there was a real row in the street last night just outside.  We are to go down a mine some day when Cousin David has time.  I mean to be a great jeologist and get lots of specimens, and please bring me home all the minerals in Ceylon.  Harry gave me a hammer.—–­I am, your affectionate son,
                                                FERGUS MERRIFIELD.’

(VALETTA.)

’MY DEAREST MAMMA—–­I hope you will like my card.  Aunt Ada did none of it, only showed me how, and Aunt Jane says I may tell you I am really trying to be good.  I am helping her gild fir-cones for a Christmas-tree for the quire, and they will sing carols.  Macrae brought some for us the day before yesterday, and a famous lot of holly and ivy and mistletoe and flowers, and three turkeys and some hams and pheasants and partridges.  Aunt Jane sent the biggest turkey and ham in a basket covered up with holly to Mrs. White, and another to Mrs. Hablot, and they are doing the church with the holly and ivy.  We are to eat the other the day after to-morrow, and Mr. Grant and Miss Burne, who teaches the youngest form, are coming.  It was only cold beef to-day, to let Mrs. Mount go to church;

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Beechcroft at Rockstone from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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