Little Women eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.

An impromptu circus, fox and geese, and an amicable game of croquet finished the afternoon.  At sunset the tent was struck, hampers packed, wickets pulled up, boats loaded, and the whole party floated down the river, singing at the tops of their voices.  Ned, getting sentimental, warbled a serenade with the pensive refrain . . .

    Alone, alone, ah!  Woe, alone,

and at the lines . . .

    We each are young, we each have a heart,
    Oh, why should we stand thus coldly apart?

he looked at Meg with such a lackadiasical expression that she laughed outright and spoiled his song.

“How can you be so cruel to me?” he whispered, under cover of a lively chorus.  “You’ve kept close to that starched-up Englishwoman all day, and now you snub me.”

“I didn’t mean to, but you looked so funny I really couldn’t help it,” replied Meg, passing over the first part of his reproach, for it was quite true that she had shunned him, remembering the Moffat party and the talk after it.

Ned was offended and turned to Sallie for consolation, saying to her rather pettishly, “There isn’t a bit of flirt in that girl, is there?”

“Not a particle, but she’s a dear,” returned Sallie, defending her friend even while confessing her shortcomings.

“She’s not a stricken deer anyway,” said Ned, trying to be witty, and succeeding as well as very young gentlemen usually do.

On the lawn where it had gathered, the little party separated with cordial good nights and good-bys, for the Vaughns were going to Canada.  As the four sisters went home through the garden, Miss Kate looked after them, saying, without the patronizing tone in her voice, “In spite of their demonstrative manners, American girls are very nice when one knows them.”

“I quite agree with you,” said Mr. Brooke.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

CASTLES IN THE AIR

Laurie lay luxuriously swinging to and fro in his hammock one warm September afternoon, wondering what his neighbors were about, but too lazy to go and find out.  He was in one of his moods, for the day had been both unprofitable and unsatisfactory, and he was wishing he could live it over again.  The hot weather made him indolent, and he had shirked his studies, tried Mr. Brooke’s patience to the utmost, displeased his grandfather by practicing half the afternoon, frightened the maidservants half out of their wits by mischievously hinting that one of his dogs was going mad, and, after high words with the stableman about some fancied neglect of his horse, he had flung himself into his hammock to fume over the stupidity of the world in general, till the peace of the lovely day quieted him in spite of himself.  Staring up into the green gloom of the horse-chestnut trees above him, he dreamed dreams of all sorts, and was just imagining himself tossing on the ocean in a voyage round the world, when the sound of voices brought him ashore in a flash.  Peeping through the meshes of the hammock, he saw the Marches coming out, as if bound on some expedition.

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Little Women from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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