Little Women eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.

By-and-by Jo roamed away upstairs, for it was rainy, and she could not walk.  A restless spirit possessed her, and the old feeling came again, not bitter as it once was, but a sorrowfully patient wonder why one sister should have all she asked, the other nothing.  It was not true, she knew that and tried to put it away, but the natural craving for affection was strong, and Amy’s happiness woke the hungry longing for someone to ’love with heart and soul, and cling to while God let them be together’.  Up in the garret, where Jo’s unquiet wanderings ended stood four little wooden chests in a row, each marked with its owners name, and each filled with relics of the childhood and girlhood ended now for all.  Jo glanced into them, and when she came to her own, leaned her chin on the edge, and stared absently at the chaotic collection, till a bundle of old exercise books caught her eye.  She drew them out, turned them over, and relived that pleasant winter at kind Mrs. Kirke’s.  She had smiled at first, then she looked thoughtful, next sad, and when she came to a little message written in the Professor’s hand, her lips began to tremble, the books slid out of her lap, and she sat looking at the friendly words, as they took a new meaning, and touched a tender spot in her heart.

“Wait for me, my friend.  I may be a little late, but I shall surely come.”

“Oh, if he only would!  So kind, so good, so patient with me always, my dear old Fritz.  I didn’t value him half enough when I had him, but now how I should love to see him, for everyone seems going away from me, and I’m all alone.”

And holding the little paper fast, as if it were a promise yet to be fulfilled, Jo laid her head down on a comfortable rag bag, and cried, as if in opposition to the rain pattering on the roof.

Was it all self-pity, loneliness, or low spirits?  Or was it the waking up of a sentiment which had bided its time as patiently as its inspirer?  Who shall say?

CHAPTER FORTY-THREE

SURPRISES

Jo was alone in the twilight, lying on the old sofa, looking at the fire, and thinking.  It was her favorite way of spending the hour of dusk.  No one disturbed her, and she used to lie there on Beth’s little red pillow, planning stories, dreaming dreams, or thinking tender thoughts of the sister who never seemed far away.  Her face looked tired, grave, and rather sad, for tomorrow was her birthday, and she was thinking how fast the years went by, how old she was getting, and how little she seemed to have accomplished.  Almost twenty-five, and nothing to show for it.  Jo was mistaken in that.  There was a good deal to show, and by-and-by she saw, and was grateful for it.

“An old maid, that’s what I’m to be.  A literary spinster, with a pen for a spouse, a family of stories for children, and twenty years hence a morsel of fame, perhaps, when, like poor Johnson, I’m old and can’t enjoy it, solitary, and can’t share it, independent, and don’t need it.  Well, I needn’t be a sour saint nor a selfish sinner, and, I dare say, old maids are very comfortable when they get used to it, but . . .” and there Jo sighed, as if the prospect was not inviting.

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Project Gutenberg
Little Women from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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