Little Women eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.

The old gentleman knew that perfectly well, and particularly desired to prevent it, for the mood in which he found his grandson assured him that it would not be wise to leave him to his own devices.  So, stifling a natural regret at the thought of the home comforts he would leave behind him, he said stoutly, “Bless your soul, I’m not superannuated yet.  I quite enjoy the idea.  It will do me good, and my old bones won’t suffer, for traveling nowadays is almost as easy as sitting in a chair.”

A restless movement from Laurie suggested that his chair was not easy, or that he did not like the plan, and made the old man add hastily, “I don’t mean to be a marplot or a burden.  I go because I think you’d feel happier than if I was left behind.  I don’t intend to gad about with you, but leave you free to go where you like, while I amuse myself in my own way.  I’ve friends in London and Paris, and should like to visit them.  Meantime you can go to Italy, Germany, Switzerland, where you will, and enjoy pictures, music, scenery, and adventures to your heart’s content.”

Now, Laurie felt just then that his heart was entirely broken and the world a howling wilderness, but at the sound of certain words which the old gentleman artfully introduced into his closing sentence, the broken heart gave an unexpected leap, and a green oasis or two suddenly appeared in the howling wilderness.  He sighed, and then said, in a spiritless tone, “Just as you like, Sir.  It doesn’t matter where I go or what I do.”

“It does to me, remember that, my lad.  I give you entire liberty, but I trust you to make an honest use of it.  Promise me that, Laurie.”

“Anything you like, Sir.”

“Good,” thought the old gentleman.  “You don’t care now, but there’ll come a time when that promise will keep you out of mischief, or I’m much mistaken.”

Being an energetic individual, Mr. Laurence struck while the iron was hot, and before the blighted being recovered spirit enough to rebel, they were off.  During the time necessary for preparation, Laurie bore himself as young gentleman usually do in such cases.  He was moody, irritable, and pensive by turns, lost his appetite, neglected his dress and devoted much time to playing tempestuously on his piano, avoided Jo, but consoled himself by staring at her from his window, with a tragic face that haunted her dreams by night and oppressed her with a heavy sense of guilt by day.  Unlike some sufferers, he never spoke of his unrequited passion, and would allow no one, not even Mrs. March, to attempt consolation or offer sympathy.  On some accounts, this was a relief to his friends, but the weeks before his departure were very uncomfortable, and everyone rejoiced that the ’poor, dear fellow was going away to forget his trouble, and come home happy’.  Of course, he smiled darkly at their delusion, but passed it by with the sad superiority of one who knew that his fidelity like his love was unalterable.

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Project Gutenberg
Little Women from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.