Little Women eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.

As I went upstairs after dinner, two of the young men were settling their hats before the hall mirror, and I heard one say low to the other, “Who’s the new party?”

“Governess, or something of that sort.”

“What the deuce is she at our table for?”

“Friend of the old lady’s.”

“Handsome head, but no style.”

“Not a bit of it.  Give us a light and come on.”

I felt angry at first, and then I didn’t care, for a governess is as good as a clerk, and I’ve got sense, if I haven’t style, which is more than some people have, judging from the remarks of the elegant beings who clattered away, smoking like bad chimneys.  I hate ordinary people!

Thursday

Yesterday was a quiet day spent in teaching, sewing, and writing in my little room, which is very cozy, with a light and fire.  I picked up a few bits of news and was introduced to the Professor.  It seems that Tina is the child of the Frenchwoman who does the fine ironing in the laundry here.  The little thing has lost her heart to Mr. Bhaer, and follows him about the house like a dog whenever he is at home, which delights him, as he is very fond of children, though a ‘bacheldore’.  Kitty and Minnie Kirke likewise regard him with affection, and tell all sorts of stories about the plays he invents, the presents he brings, and the splendid tales he tells.  The younger men quiz him, it seems, call him Old Fritz, Lager Beer, Ursa Major, and make all manner of jokes on his name.  But he enjoys it like a boy, Mrs. Kirke says, and takes it so good-naturedly that they all like him in spite of his foreign ways.

The maiden lady is a Miss Norton, rich, cultivated, and kind.  She spoke to me at dinner today (for I went to table again, it’s such fun to watch people), and asked me to come and see her at her room.  She has fine books and pictures, knows interesting persons, and seems friendly, so I shall make myself agreeable, for I do want to get into good society, only it isn’t the same sort that Amy likes.

I was in our parlor last evening when Mr. Bhaer came in with some newspapers for Mrs. Kirke.  She wasn’t there, but Minnie, who is a little old woman, introduced me very prettily.  “This is Mamma’s friend, Miss March.”

“Yes, and she’s jolly and we like her lots,” added Kitty, who is an ‘enfant terrible’.

We both bowed, and then we laughed, for the prim introduction and the blunt addition were rather a comical contrast.

“Ah, yes, I hear these naughty ones go to vex you, Mees Marsch.  If so again, call at me and I come,” he said, with a threatening frown that delighted the little wretches.

I promised I would, and he departed, but it seems as if I was doomed to see a good deal of him, for today as I passed his door on my way out, by accident I knocked against it with my umbrella.  It flew open, and there he stood in his dressing gown, with a big blue sock on one hand and a darning needle in the other.  He didn’t seem at all ashamed of it, for when I explained and hurried on, he waved his hand, sock and all, saying in his loud, cheerful way . . .

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Project Gutenberg
Little Women from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.