Little Women eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.
unfriendly conduct, was a rumor which some obliging gossip had whispered to her, that the March girls had made fun of her at the Lambs’.  All the blame of this should have fallen upon Jo, for her naughty imitation had been too lifelike to escape detection, and the frolicsome Lambs had permitted the joke to escape.  No hint of this had reached the culprits, however, and Amy’s dismay can be imagined, when, the very evening before the fair, as she was putting the last touches to her pretty table, Mrs. Chester, who, of course, resented the supposed ridicule of her daughter, said, in a bland tone, but with a cold look . . .

“I find, dear, that there is some feeling among the young ladies about my giving this table to anyone but my girls.  As this is the most prominent, and some say the most attractive table of all, and they are the chief getters-up of the fair, it is thought best for them to take this place.  I’m sorry, but I know you are too sincerely interested in the cause to mind a little personal disappointment, and you shall have another table if you like.”

Mrs. Chester fancied beforehand that it would be easy to deliver this little speech, but when the time came, she found it rather difficult to utter it naturally, with Amy’s unsuspicious eyes looking straight at her full of surprise and trouble.

Amy felt that there was something behind this, but could not guess what, and said quietly, feeling hurt, and showing that she did, “Perhaps you had rather I took no table at all?”

“Now, my dear, don’t have any ill feeling, I beg.  It’s merely a matter of expediency, you see, my girls will naturally take the lead, and this table is considered their proper place.  I think it very appropriate to you, and feel very grateful for your efforts to make it so pretty, but we must give up our private wishes, of course, and I will see that you have a good place elsewhere.  Wouldn’t you like the flower table?  The little girls undertook it, but they are discouraged.  You could make a charming thing of it, and the flower table is always attractive you know.”

“Especially to gentlemen,” added May, with a look which enlightened Amy as to one cause of her sudden fall from favor.  She colored angrily, but took no other notice of that girlish sarcasm, and answered with unexpected amiability . . .

“It shall be as you please, Mrs. Chester.  I’ll give up my place here at once, and attend to the flowers, if you like.”

“You can put your own things on your own table, if you prefer,” began May, feeling a little conscience-stricken, as she looked at the pretty racks, the painted shells, and quaint illuminations Amy had so carefully made and so gracefully arranged.  She meant it kindly, but Amy mistook her meaning, and said quickly . . .

“Oh, certainly, if they are in your way,” and sweeping her contributions into her apron, pell-mell, she walked off, feeling that herself and her works of art had been insulted past forgiveness.

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Little Women from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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