Little Women eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.

“You’ve got me, anyhow.  I’m not good for much, I know, but I’ll stand by you, Jo, all the days of my life.  Upon my word I will!” and Laurie meant what he said.

“I know you will, and I’m ever so much obliged.  You are always a great comfort to me, Teddy,” returned Jo, gratefully shaking hands.

“Well, now, don’t be dismal, there’s a good fellow.  It’s all right you see.  Meg is happy, Brooke will fly round and get settled immediately, Grandpa will attend to him, and it will be very jolly to see Meg in her own little house.  We’ll have capital times after she is gone, for I shall be through college before long, and then we’ll go abroad on some nice trip or other.  Wouldn’t that console you?”

“I rather think it would, but there’s no knowing what may happen in three years,” said Jo thoughtfully.

“That’s true.  Don’t you wish you could take a look forward and see where we shall all be then?  I do,” returned Laurie.

“I think not, for I might see something sad, and everyone looks so happy now, I don’t believe they could be much improved.”  And Jo’s eyes went slowly round the room, brightening as they looked, for the prospect was a pleasant one.

Father and Mother sat together, quietly reliving the first chapter of the romance which for them began some twenty years ago.  Amy was drawing the lovers, who sat apart in a beautiful world of their own, the light of which touched their faces with a grace the little artist could not copy.  Beth lay on her sofa, talking cheerily with her old friend, who held her little hand as if he felt that it possessed the power to lead him along the peaceful way she walked.  Jo lounged in her favorite low seat, with the grave quiet look which best became her, and Laurie, leaning on the back of her chair, his chin on a level with her curly head, smiled with his friendliest aspect, and nodded at her in the long glass which reflected them both.

So the curtain falls upon Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy.  Whether it ever rises again, depends upon the reception given the first act of the domestic drama called Little Women.

LITTLE WOMEN PART 2

In order that we may start afresh and go to Meg’s wedding . . .

CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR

GOSSIP

In order that we may start afresh and go to Meg’s wedding with free minds, it will be well to begin with a little gossip about the Marches.  And here let me premise that if any of the elders think there is too much ‘lovering’ in the story, as I fear they may (I’m not afraid the young folks will make that objection), I can only say with Mrs. March, “What can you expect when I have four gay girls in the house, and a dashing young neighbor over the way?”

The three years that have passed have brought but few changes to the quiet family.  The war is over, and Mr. March safely at home, busy with his books and the small parish which found in him a minister by nature as by grace, a quiet, studious man, rich in the wisdom that is better than learning, the charity which calls all mankind ‘brother’, the piety that blossoms into character, making it august and lovely.

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Project Gutenberg
Little Women from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.