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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 552 pages of information about Little Women.

Mrs. March and Jo were deep in their own affairs, when a sound from Meg made them look up to see her staring at her note with a frightened face.

“My child, what is it?” cried her mother, running to her, while Jo tried to take the paper which had done the mischief.

“It’s all a mistake, he didn’t send it.  Oh, Jo, how could you do it?” and Meg hid her face in her hands, crying as if her heart were quite broken.

“Me!  I’ve done nothing!  What’s she talking about?” cried Jo, bewildered.

Meg’s mild eyes kindled with anger as she pulled a crumpled note from her pocket and threw it at Jo, saying reproachfully, “You wrote it, and that bad boy helped you.  How could you be so rude, so mean, and cruel to us both?”

Jo hardly heard her, for she and her mother were reading the note, which was written in a peculiar hand.

“My Dearest Margaret,

“I can no longer restrain my passion, and must know my fate before I return.  I dare not tell your parents yet, but I think they would consent if they knew that we adored one another.  Mr. Laurence will help me to some good place, and then, my sweet girl, you will make me happy.  I implore you to say nothing to your family yet, but to send one word of hope through Laurie to,

“Your devoted John.”

“Oh, the little villain!  That’s the way he meant to pay me for keeping my word to Mother.  I’ll give him a hearty scolding and bring him over to beg pardon,” cried Jo, burning to execute immediate justice.  But her mother held her back, saying, with a look she seldom wore . . .

“Stop, Jo, you must clear yourself first.  You have played so many pranks that I am afraid you have had a hand in this.”

“On my word, Mother, I haven’t!  I never saw that note before, and don’t know anything about it, as true as I live!” said Jo, so earnestly that they believed her.  “If I had taken part in it I’d have done it better than this, and have written a sensible note.  I should think you’d have known Mr. Brooke wouldn’t write such stuff as that,” she added, scornfully tossing down the paper.

“It’s like his writing,” faltered Meg, comparing it with the note in her hand.

“Oh, Meg, you didn’t answer it?” cried Mrs. March quickly.

“Yes, I did!” and Meg hid her face again, overcome with shame.

“Here’s a scrape!  Do let me bring that wicked boy over to explain and be lectured.  I can’t rest till I get hold of him.”  And Jo made for the door again.

“Hush!  Let me handle this, for it is worse than I thought.  Margaret, tell me the whole story,” commanded Mrs. March, sitting down by Meg, yet keeping hold of Jo, lest she should fly off.

“I received the first letter from Laurie, who didn’t look as if he knew anything about it,” began Meg, without looking up.  “I was worried at first and meant to tell you, then I remembered how you liked Mr. Brooke, so I thought you wouldn’t mind if I kept my little secret for a few days.  I’m so silly that I liked to think no one knew, and while I was deciding what to say, I felt like the girls in books, who have such things to do.  Forgive me, Mother, I’m paid for my silliness now.  I never can look him in the face again.”

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