Fair Em eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 38 pages of information about Fair Em.
Now requisite, now that I know thy mind
Something enclined to favour Manvils suit,
A gentleman, thy Lover in protest;
And that thou maist not be by love deceived,
But try his meaning fit for thy desert,
In pursuit of all amorous desires,
Regard thine honour.  Let not vehement sighs,
Nor earnest vows importing fervent love,
Render thee subject to the wrath of lust: 
For that, transformed to form of sweet delight,
Will bring thy body and thy soul to shame. 
Chaste thoughts and modest conversations,
Of proof to keep out all inchaunting vows,
Vain sighs, forst tears, and pitiful aspects,
Are they that make deformed Ladies fair,
Poor rich:  and such intycing men,
That seek of all but only present grace,
Shall in perseverance of a Virgins due
Prefer the most refusers to the choice
Of such a soul as yielded what they thought. 
But ho:  where is Trotter?

[Here enters Trotter, the Millers man, to them:  And they within call to him for their gryste.]

Trotter.  Wheres Trotter? why, Trotter is here.  Yfaith, you and your daughter go up and down weeping and wamenting, and keeping of a wamentation, as who should say, the Mill would go with your wamenting.

Miller
How now, Trotter? why complainest thou so?

Trotter.  Why, yonder is a company of young men and maids, keep such a stir for their grist, that they would have it before my stones be ready to grind it.  But, yfaith, I would I could break wind enough backward:  you should not tarry for your gryst, I warrant you.

Miller
Content thee, Trotter, I will go pacify them.

Trotter
Iwis you will when I cannot.  Why, look, you have a Mill—­
Why, whats your Mill without me?  Or rather, Mistress, what
were I without you?

[Here he taketh Em about the neck.]

Em
Nay, Trotter, if you fall achyding, I will give you over.

Trotter.  I chide you, dame, to amend you.  You are too fine to be a Millers daughter; for if you should but stoop to take up the tole dish, you will have the cramp in your finger at least ten weeks after.

Miller.  Ah, well said, Trotter; teach her to play the good huswife, and thou shalt have her to thy wife, if thou canst get her good will.

Trotter.  Ah, words wherein I see Matrimony come loaden with kisses to salute me!  Now let me alone to pick the Mill, to fill the hopper, to take the tole, to mend the sails, yea, and to make the mill to go with the very force of my love.

[Here they must call for their gryst within.]

Trotter
I come, I come; yfaith, now you shall have your gryst, or else
Trotter will trot and amble himself to death.

[They call him again.  Exit.]

SCENE III.

The Danish Court.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Fair Em from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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