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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 441 pages of information about The Canadian Brothers, or the Prophecy Fulfilled a Tale of the Late American War Complete.

Not the least deeply interested in the events of the morning, was the old negro.  During their meal, at the service of which he assisted, his eyes scarcely quitted her whom be appeared to regard with a mingled feeling of awe and adoration; nay, such was his abstraction that, in attempting to place a dish of game on the rude table at which the party sat, he lodged the whole of the contents in the lap of Middlemore, a gaucherie that drew from the latter an exclamation of horror, followed however the instant afterwards by Sambo’s apology.

“I beg a pardon Massa Middlemore,” he exclaimed, “I let him fall e gravey in e lap.”

“Then will you by some means contrive to lap it up,” returned the officer quaintly.

Sambo applied his napkin, and the dinner proceeded without other occurrence.  Owing to an apprehension that the night air might tend to renew the inflammation of the wounded arm, the boat was early in readiness for the return of the party, whose day of pleasure had been in some manner tamed into a day of mourning, so that long before sun set, they had again reached their respective homes at Detroit.

END OF VOLUME I.

VOLUME II.

The Canadian brothers;
   or,
the prophecy fulfilled.

CHAPTER I.

A few days after the adventure detailed in our last chapter, the American party, consisting of Major and Miss Montgomerie, and the daughters of the Governor, with their attendants, embarked in the schooner, to the command of which Gerald had been promoted.  The destination of the whole was the American port of Buffalo, situate at the further extremity of the lake, nearly opposite to the fort of Erie; and thither our hero, perfectly recovered from the effect of his accident, received instructions to repair without loss of time, land his charge, and immediately rejoin the flotilla at Amherstburg.

However pleasing the first, the latter part of the order was by no means so strictly in consonance with the views and feelings of the new commander, as might have been expected from a young and enterprising spirit; but he justified his absence of zeal to himself, in the fact that there was no positive service to perform; no duty in which he could have an opportunity of signalizing himself, or rendering a benefit to his country.

If, however, the limited period allotted for the execution of his duty, was a source of much disappointment to Gerald, such was not the effect produced by it on his brother, to whom it gave promise of a speedy, termination of an attachment, which he had all along regarded with disapprobation, and a concern amounting almost to dread.  We have seen that Henry Grantham, on the occasion of his brother’s disaster at the pic-nic, had been wound up into an enthusiasm of gratitude, which had

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