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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 288 pages of information about A Zola Dictionary; the Characters of the Rougon-Macquart Novels of Emile Zola;.

LOUISETTE, the younger daughter of Madame Misard (Aunt Phasie).  She was a fair and sweet child who had a strong affection for Cabuche, a man who was regarded by nearly everyone as an outcast.  As a maid-servant in the house of Madame Bonnehon, she attracted the notice of President Grandmorin, and fleeing from him, half-mad with fear, she came to the hut of Cabuche, who tenderly nursed her till she died of brain fever a few days later.  La Bete Humaine.

LOULOU, a dog which belonged to Nana.  Nana.

LULU, a dog which belonged to Nana.  Nana.

LUSIGNAN, a racehorse in the stable of Vandeuvres.  Mounted by Gresham, it was the favourite in the race for the Grand Prix de Paris.  Nana.

M

MACQUART, a poacher and smuggler who lived at Plassans in a hovel adjoining the Fouque property.  His reputation was of the worst, and “although no crimes had actually been brought home to him, the first suspicions always fell upon him whenever a theft or murder had been perpetrated in the country.”  He frequently disappeared for long periods, but during his short sojourns in the town he drank to great excess.  He became the lover of Adelaide Fouque in 1789, less than a year after the death of her husband, and had two children by her, Antoine and Ursule Macquart.  A man of violent and unrestrained passions, and of incorrigibly lazy habits, he retained complete influence over Adelaide, and they lived in the same relationship for over twenty years.  About 1810, Macquart was killed on the frontier by a custom-house officer while he was endeavouring to smuggle a cargo of Geneva watches into France.  Adelaide was sole legatee, the estate consisting of the hovel at Plassans and the carbine of the deceased, which a smuggler loyally brought back to her.  La Fortune des Rougon.

MACQUART (ANTOINE), born 1789, son of Macquart the smuggler and Adelaide Fouque; was drawn in the conscription in 1809.  On his return to Plassans, he found that his half-brother Pierre had sold the family property and had appropriated the proceeds.  Being a confirmed drunkard, he was averse from work of any kind, but in order to support himself he learned the trade of basket-making.  In 1826 he married Josephine Gavaudan, a market-woman, whom he afterwards allowed to support him.  They had three children, Lisa, Gervaise, and Jean.  His wife died in 1850, and soon after his daughter Gervaise and his son Jean, who had assisted to keep him in idleness, ran off.  He had a bitter ill-will towards his brother Pierre Rougon, and, chiefly with a view to his annoyance, expressed strong Republican principles.  For the same reason he took every opportunity of teaching these principles to his young nephew Silvere Mouret.  After the Coup d’Etat he took an active share in the agitation which resulted in a Republican rising.  When the Insurgents left Plassans, he remained with a few men to overawe the

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