The Blue Fairy Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The Blue Fairy Book.

The next day the sorcerer, tied to the tail of a savage mule loaded with nuts, was broken into as many pieces as there were nuts upon the mule’s back.[1]

[1] Traditions Populaires de l’Asie Mineure.  Carnoy et Nicolaides.  Paris:  Maisonneuve, 1889.

PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS

Once upon a time there lived a king who was deeply in love with a princess, but she could not marry anyone, because she was under an enchantment.  So the King set out to seek a fairy, and asked what he could do to win the Princess’s love.  The Fairy said to him: 

“You know that the Princess has a great cat which she is very fond of.  Whoever is clever enough to tread on that cat’s tail is the man she is destined to marry.”

The King said to himself that this would not be very difficult, and he left the Fairy, determined to grind the cat’s tail to powder rather than not tread on it at all.

You may imagine that it was not long before he went to see the Princess, and puss, as usual, marched in before him, arching his back.  The King took a long step, and quite thought he had the tail under his foot, but the cat turned round so sharply that he only trod on air.  And so it went on for eight days, till the King began to think that this fatal tail must be full of quicksilver—­it was never still for a moment.

At last, however, he was lucky enough to come upon puss fast asleep and with his tail conveniently spread out.  So the King, without losing a moment, set his foot upon it heavily.

With one terrific yell the cat sprang up and instantly changed into a tall man, who, fixing his angry eyes upon the King, said: 

“You shall marry the Princess because you have been able to break the enchantment, but I will have my revenge.  You shall have a son, who will never be happy until he finds out that his nose is too long, and if you ever tell anyone what I have just said to you, you shall vanish away instantly, and no one shall ever see you or hear of you again.”

Though the King was horribly afraid of the enchanter, he could not help laughing at this threat.

“If my son has such a long nose as that,” he said to himself, “he must always see it or feel it; at least, if he is not blind or without hands.”

But, as the enchanter had vanished, he did not waste any more time in thinking, but went to seek the Princess, who very soon consented to marry him.  But after all, they had not been married very long when the King died, and the Queen had nothing left to care for but her little son, who was called Hyacinth.  The little Prince had large blue eyes, the prettiest eyes in the world, and a sweet little mouth, but, alas! his nose was so enormous that it covered half his face.  The Queen was inconsolable when she saw this great nose, but her ladies assured her that it was not really as large as it looked; that it was a Roman nose, and you had only to open any history to see that every hero has a large nose.  The Queen, who was devoted to her baby, was pleased with what they told her, and when she looked at Hyacinth again, his nose certainly did not seem to her quite so large.

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The Blue Fairy Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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