Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The Blue Fairy Book.

“Nay,” said Jack, “if this be the case I’d better dispatch you!” so, jumping upon the block, he stabbed him in the back, when he dropped down dead.

Jack then proceeded on his journey, and traveled over hills and dales, till arriving at the foot of a high mountain he knocked at the door of a lonely house, when an old man let him in.

When Jack was seated the hermit thus addressed him:  “My son, on the top of this mountain is an enchanted castle, kept by the giant Galligantus and a vile magician.  I lament the fate of a duke’s daughter, whom they seized as she was walking in her father’s garden, and brought hither transformed into a deer.”

Jack promised that in the morning, at the risk of his life, he would break the enchantment; and after a sound sleep he rose early, put on his invisible coat, and got ready for the attempt.

When he had climbed to the top of the mountain he saw two fiery griffins, but he passed between them without the least fear of danger, for they could not see him because of his invisible coat.  On the castle gate he found a golden trumpet, under which were written these lines: 

  “Whoever can this trumpet blow
  Shall cause the giant’s overthrow.”

As soon as Jack had read this he seized the trumpet and blew a shrill blast, which made the gates fly open and the very castle itself tremble.

The giant and the conjurer now knew that their wicked course was at an end, and they stood biting their thumbs and shaking with fear.  Jack, with his sword of sharpness, soon killed the giant, and the magician was then carried away by a whirlwind; and every knight and beautiful lady who had been changed into birds and beasts returned to their proper shapes.  The castle vanished away like smoke, and the head of the giant Galligantus was then sent to King Arthur.

The knights and ladies rested that night at the old man’s hermitage, and next day they set out for the Court.  Jack then went up to the King, and gave his Majesty an account of all his fierce battles.

Jack’s fame had now spread through the whole country, and at the King’s desire the duke gave him his daughter in marriage, to the joy of all his kingdom.  After this the King gave him a large estate, on which he and his lady lived the rest of their days in joy and contentment.[1]

[1] Old Chapbook.

THE BLACK BULL OF NORROWAY

And many a hunting song they sung,
  And song of game and glee;
Then tuned to plaintive strains their tongue,
  “Of Scotland’s luve and lee.” 
To wilder measures next they turn
  “The Black, Black Bull of Norroway!”
Sudden the tapers cease to burn,
  The minstrels cease to play. 
       “The Cout of Keeldar,” by J. Leyden.

Follow Us on Facebook