The Blue Fairy Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The Blue Fairy Book.

“I see,” replied sister Anne, “a great dust, which comes on this side here.”

“Are they my brothers?”

“Alas! no, my dear sister, I see a flock of sheep.”

“Will you not come down?” cried Blue Beard

“One moment longer,” said his wife, and then she cried out:  “Anne, sister Anne, dost thou see nobody coming?”

“I see,” said she, “two horsemen, but they are yet a great way off.”

“God be praised,” replied the poor wife joyfully; “they are my brothers; I will make them a sign, as well as I can, for them to make haste.”

Then Blue Beard bawled out so loud that he made the whole house tremble.  The distressed wife came down, and threw herself at his feet, all in tears, with her hair about her shoulders.

“This signifies nothing,” says Blue Beard; “you must die”; then, taking hold of her hair with one hand, and lifting up the sword with the other, he was going to take off her head.  The poor lady, turning about to him, and looking at him with dying eyes, desired him to afford her one little moment to recollect herself.

“No, no,” said he, “recommend thyself to God,” and was just ready to strike . . .

At this very instant there was such a loud knocking at the gate that Blue Beard made a sudden stop.  The gate was opened, and presently entered two horsemen, who, drawing their swords, ran directly to Blue Beard.  He knew them to be his wife’s brothers, one a dragoon, the other a musketeer, so that he ran away immediately to save himself; but the two brothers pursued so close that they overtook him before he could get to the steps of the porch, when they ran their swords through his body and left him dead.  The poor wife was almost as dead as her husband, and had not strength enough to rise and welcome her brothers.

Blue Beard had no heirs, and so his wife became mistress of all his estate.  She made use of one part of it to marry her sister Anne to a young gentleman who had loved her a long while; another part to buy captains commissions for her brothers, and the rest to marry herself to a very worthy gentleman, who made her forget the ill time she had passed with Blue Beard.[1]

[1] Charles Perrault.

TRUSTY JOHN

Once upon a time there was an old king who was so ill that he thought to himself, “I am most likely on my death-bed.”  Then he said, “Send Trusty John to me.”  Now Trusty John was his favorite servant, and was so called because all his life he had served him so faithfully.  When he approached the bed the King spake to him:  “Most trusty John, I feel my end is drawing near, and I could face it without a care were it not for my son.  He is still too young to decide everything for himself, and unless you promise me to instruct him in all he should know, and to be to him as a father, I shall not close my eyes in peace.”  Then Trusty John answered:  “I will never desert

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Blue Fairy Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook