The Blue Fairy Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The Blue Fairy Book.

“Oh! mercy,” cried the mother; “what is it I see?  Oh! it is that wretch her sister who has occasioned all this; but she shall pay for it”; and immediately she ran to beat her.  The poor child fled away from her, and went to hide herself in the forest, not far from thence.

The King’s son, then on his return from hunting, met her, and seeing her so very pretty, asked her what she did there alone and why she cried.

“Alas! sir, my mamma has turned me out of doors.”

The King’s son, who saw five or six pearls and as many diamonds come out of her mouth, desired her to tell him how that happened.  She thereupon told him the whole story; and so the King’s son fell in love with her, and, considering himself that such a gift was worth more than any marriage portion, conducted her to the palace of the King his father, and there married her.

As for the sister, she made herself so much hated that her own mother turned her off; and the miserable wretch, having wandered about a good while without finding anybody to take her in, went to a corner of the wood, and there died.[1]

[1] Charles Perrault.

PRINCE DARLING

ONCE upon a time there lived a king who was so just and kind that his subjects called him “the Good King.”  It happened one day, when he was out hunting, that a little white rabbit, which his dogs were chasing, sprang into his arms for shelter.  The King stroked it gently, and said to it: 

“Well, bunny, as you have come to me for protection I will see that nobody hurts you.”

And he took it home to his palace and had it put in a pretty little house, with all sorts of nice things to eat.

That night, when he was alone in his room, a beautiful lady suddenly appeared before him; her long dress was as white as snow, and she had a crown of white roses upon her head.  The good King was very much surprised to see her, for he knew his door had been tightly shut, and he could not think how she had got in.  But she said to him: 

“I am the Fairy Truth.  I was passing through the wood when you were out hunting, and I wished to find out if you were really good, as everybody said you were, so I took the shape of a little rabbit and came to your arms for shelter, for I know that those who are merciful to animals will be still kinder to their fellow-men.  If you had refused to help me I should have been certain that you were wicked.  I thank you for the kindness you have shown me, which has made me your friend for ever.  You have only to ask me for anything you want and I promise that I will give it to you.”

“Madam,” said the good King, “since you are a fairy you no doubt know all my wishes.  I have but one son whom I love very dearly, that is why he is called Prince Darling.  If you are really good enough to wish to do me a favor, I beg that you will become his friend.”

“With all my heart,” answered the Fairy.  “I can make your son the handsomest prince in the world, or the richest, or the most powerful; choose whichever you like for him.”

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The Blue Fairy Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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