The Blue Fairy Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The Blue Fairy Book.
would pass by at so late an hour.  The evening sun shone on the glittering stones, and they glanced and gleamed so beautifully that the children stood still and gazed on them.  “What are you standing there gaping for?” screamed the dwarf, and his ashen-gray face became scarlet with rage.  He was about to go off with these angry words when a sudden growl was heard, and a black bear trotted out of the wood.  The dwarf jumped up in great fright, but he hadn’t time to reach his place of retreat, for the bear was already close to him.  Then he cried in terror:  “Dear Mr. Bear, spare me!  I’ll give you all my treasure.  Look at those beautiful precious stones lying there.  Spare my life! what pleasure would you get from a poor feeble little fellow like me?  You won’t feel me between your teeth.  There, lay hold of these two wicked girls, they will be a tender morsel for you, as fat as young quails; eat them up, for heaven’s sake.”  But the bear, paying no attention to his words, gave the evil little creature one blow with his paw, and he never moved again.

The girls had run away, but the bear called after them:  “Snow-white and Rose-red, don’t be afraid; wait, and I’ll come with you.”  Then they recognized his voice and stood still, and when the bear was quite close to them his skin suddenly fell off, and a beautiful man stood beside them, all dressed in gold.  “I am a king’s son,” he said, “and have been doomed by that unholy little dwarf, who had stolen my treasure, to roam about the woods as a wild bear till his death should set me free.  Now he has got his well-merited punishment.”

Snow-white married him, and Rose-red his brother, and they divided the great treasure the dwarf had collected in his cave between them.  The old mother lived for many years peacefully with her children; and she carried the two rose trees with her, and they stood in front of her window, and every year they bore the finest red and white roses.[1]

[1] Grimm.

THE GOOSE-GIRL

Once upon a time an old queen, whose husband had been dead for many years, had a beautiful daughter.  When she grew up she was betrothed to a prince who lived a great way off.  Now, when the time drew near for her to be married and to depart into a foreign kingdom, her old mother gave her much costly baggage, and many ornaments, gold and silver, trinkets and knicknacks, and, in fact, everything that belonged to a royal trousseau, for she loved her daughter very dearly.  She gave her a waiting-maid also, who was to ride with her and hand her over to the bridegroom, and she provided each of them with a horse for the journey.  Now the Princess’s horse was called Falada, and could speak.

When the hour for departure drew near the old mother went to her bedroom, and taking a small knife she cut her fingers till they bled; then she held a white rag under them, and letting three drops of blood fall into it, she gave it to her daughter, and said:  “Dear child, take great care of this rag:  it may be of use to you on the journey.”

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Blue Fairy Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook