The Blue Fairy Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The Blue Fairy Book.

“Unhappy girl!” cried Ali Baba and his son, “what have you done to ruin us?”

“It was to preserve you, master, not to ruin you,” answered Morgiana.  “See here,” opening the false merchant’s garment and showing the dagger; “see what an enemy you have entertained!  Remember, he would eat no salt with you, and what more would you have?  Look at him! he is both the false oil merchant and the Captain of the Forty Thieves.”

Ali Baba was so grateful to Morgiana for thus saving his life that he offered her to his son in marriage, who readily consented, and a few days after the wedding was celebrated with greatest splendor.

At the end of a year Ali Baba, hearing nothing of the two remaining robbers, judged they were dead, and set out to the cave.  The door opened on his saying:  “Open Sesame!” He went in, and saw that nobody had been there since the Captain left it.  He brought away as much gold as he could carry, and returned to town.  He told his son the secret of the cave, which his son handed down in his turn, so the children and grandchildren of Ali Baba were rich to the end of their lives.[1]

[1] Arabian Nights.

HANSEL AND GRETTEL

Once upon a time there dwelt on the outskirts of a large forest a poor woodcutter with his wife and two children; the boy was called Hansel and the girl Grettel.  He had always little enough to live on, and once, when there was a great famine in the land, he couldn’t even provide them with daily bread.  One night, as he was tossing about in bed, full of cares and worry, he sighed and said to his wife:  “What’s to become of us? how are we to support our poor children, now that we have nothing more for ourselves?” “I’ll tell you what, husband,” answered the woman; “early to-morrow morning we’ll take the children out into the thickest part of the wood; there we shall light a fire for them and give them each a piece of bread; then we’ll go on to our work and leave them alone.  They won’t be able to find their way home, and we shall thus be rid of them.”  “No, wife,” said her husband, “that I won’t do; how could I find it in my heart to leave my children alone in the wood?  The wild beasts would soon come and tear them to pieces.”  “Oh! you fool,” said she, “then we must all four die of hunger, and you may just as well go and plane the boards for our coffins”; and she left him no peace till he consented.  “But I can’t help feeling sorry for the poor children,” added the husband.

The children, too, had not been able to sleep for hunger, and had heard what their step-mother had said to their father.  Grettel wept bitterly and spoke to Hansel:  “Now it’s all up with us.”  “No, no, Grettel,” said Hansel, “don’t fret yourself; I’ll be able to find a way to escape, no fear.”  And when the old people had fallen asleep he got up, slipped on his little coat, opened the back door and stole out.  The moon was shining clearly, and the white pebbles which lay in front of the house glittered like bits of silver.  Hansel bent down and filled his pocket with as many of them as he could cram in.  Then he went back and said to Grettel:  “Be comforted, my dear little sister, and go to sleep:  God will not desert us”; and he lay down in bed again.

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The Blue Fairy Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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