State of the Union Address eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 28 pages of information about State of the Union Address.

Our envoys extraordinary to the French Republic embarked—­one in July, the other in August—­to join their colleague in Holland.  I have received intelligence of the arrival of both of them in Holland, from whence they all proceeded on their journeys to Paris within a few days of the 19th of September.  Whatever may be the result of this mission, I trust that nothing will have been omitted on my part to conduct the negotiation to a successful conclusion, on such equitable terms as may be compatible with the safety, honor and interest of the United States.  Nothing, in the mean time, will contribute so much to the preservation of peace and the attainment of justice as manifestation of that energy and unanimity of which on many former occasions the people of the United States have given such memorable proofs, and the exertion of those resources for national defense which a beneficent Providence has kindly placed within their power.

It may be confidently asserted that nothing has occurred since the adjournment of Congress which renders inexpedient those precautionary measures recommended by me to the consideration of the two Houses at the opening of your late extraordinary session.  If that system was then prudent, it is more so now, as increasing depredations strengthen the reasons for its adoption.

Indeed, whatever may be the issue of the negotiation with France, and whether the war in Europe is or is not to continue, I hold it most certain that permanent tranquillity and order will not soon be obtained.  The state of society has so long been disturbed, the sense of moral and religious obligations so much weakened, public faith and national honor have been so impaired, respect to treaties has been so diminished, and the law of nations has lost so much of its force, while pride, ambition, avarice and violence have been so long unrestrained, there remains no reasonable ground on which to raise an expectation that a commerce without protection or defense will not be plundered.

The commerce of the United States is essential, if not to their existence, at least to their comfort, their growth, prosperity, and happiness.  The genius, character, and habits of the people are highly commercial.  Their cities have been formed and exist upon commerce.  Our agriculture, fisheries, arts, and manufactures are connected with and depend upon it.  In short, commerce has made this country what it is, and it can not be destroyed or neglected without involving the people in poverty and distress.  Great numbers are directly and solely supported by navigation.  The faith of society is pledged for the preservation of the rights of commercial and sea faring no less than of the other citizens.  Under this view of our affairs, I should hold myself guilty of a neglect of duty if I forbore to recommend that we should make every exertion to protect our commerce and to place our country in a suitable posture of defense as the only sure means of preserving both.

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State of the Union Address from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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