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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 272 pages of information about Katherine's Sheaves.

She softly closed the door, and the man went obediently to do her bidding; while, “after the storm there was a great calm” in his heart.

CHAPTER XX.

Interesting developments.

Phillip Stanley sped across the street to do his errand and inquired for Katherine.

She heard his voice and went directly to him when he told her what her mother had just said about Dorrie, and the light that leaped into her great brown eyes inspired him with fresh hope.

“Ah! mamma is holding her in the ‘secret place,’ and we know she is safe,” she said, in a reverent tone.

She quickly brought the wrapper; then, with a brief handclasp, he bade her “good-night” and retraced his steps.

Before going upstairs he sought the kitchen, where the cook was lingering, thinking something might be needed, and ordered a dainty lunch prepared; then, taking both tray and garment, he left them at Dorrie’s door and passed on to the next room to find his sister just waking.

“Phillip!” she cried, starting up, “I have been asleep!”

“Yes, Emelie, for more than three hours, I am glad to say.”

“Oh, how inconsiderate of me!  And—­Dorrie?” she questioned, in a quavering voice.

“Is more comfortable.  She has been awake twice, and had two glasses of milk,” replied her brother, as he laid a gentle, but restraining hand upon her shoulder, for she was on the point of rising.

She regarded him wonderingly.

“Phillip!  I can’t believe it!  I must go to her,” she said, almost breathless.

“No; Mrs. Minturn is going to remain all night.  She says she is not to be disturbed, and we must respect her wishes,” said Dr. Stanley, authoritatively.  “She will call you if you are needed, but says she wants us both to rest, if possible.  Now lie down again, dear, and I will sit in the Morris chair in the hall, to be near if you wish to speak to me.”

Mrs. Seabrook sat irresolute a moment, her eyes anxious and yearning.

“Emelie, you have voluntarily given Dorrie into God’s hands; now prove that you trust Him,” her companion gravely admonished.

She looked up at him and smiled.

“Yes, I will; and I believe that ’His hand is not shortened that it cannot save, nor His ear heavy that it cannot hear,’” she replied, and immediately lay back upon her pillow.

Her brother covered her with a shawl, then left her with a thankful heart, for he knew she was sadly in need of rest.

Going to his room, he secured his copy of “Science and Health,” and, retracing his steps, settled himself to read by the table in the hall, which was often used as a sitting room.

As he sat down he observed that Mrs. Minturn’s wrapper and the tray had disappeared; then he became absorbed in his book.

The next he knew a hand was laid softly on his shoulder, and, starting erect, he saw that a new day was just breaking and Mrs. Minturn standing beside him, looking as fresh and serene as if she had just come from hours of sweet repose instead of from a long night’s vigil.

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