Frederick Chopin, as a Man and Musician — Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 812 pages of information about Frederick Chopin, as a Man and Musician Complete.
Chopin [writes Hiller], who was not known to any of them, and extremely reserved, kept close to me during the walk, observing everything and making remarks to me in a low, low tone.  For the later part of the evening we were invited to the Schadows’, who were never wanting in hospitality.  We found there some of the most eminent young painters.  The conversation soon became very animated, and all would have been right if poor Chopin had not sat there so reserved—­not to say unnoticed.  However, Mendelssohn and I knew that he would have his revenge, and were secretly rejoicing at the thought.  At last the piano was opened; I began, Mendelssohn followed; then we asked Chopin to play, and rather doubtful looks were cast at him and us.  But he had hardly played a few bars when all present, especially Schadow, looked at him with altogether different eyes.  Nothing like it had ever been heard.  They were all in the greatest delight, and begged for more and more.  Count Almaviva had dropped his disguise, and all were speechless.

The following day Chopin and Hiller set out per steamer for Coblenz, and Mendelssohn, although Schadow had asked him what was to become of “St. Paul,” at which he was working, accompanied them as far as Cologne.  There, after a visit to the Apostles’ church, they parted at the Rhine bridge, and, as Mendelssohn wrote to his mother, “the pleasant episode was over.”

CHAPTER XVII

1834-1835.

Matuszynski Settles in Paris.—­More about Chopin’s way of life.—­
Op. 25.—­He is advised to write an opera.—­His own ideas in
regard to this, and A discussion of the question.—­Chopin’s
public appearances.—­Berlioz’s concert.—­STOEPEL’s concert.—­A
concert at Pleyel’s rooms.—­A concert at the theatre-Italien for
the benefit of the indigent polish refugees.—­A concert of the
societe des concerts.—­Chopin as A public performer.—­Chouquet,
Liszt, etc., On the character of his playing.—­Bellini and his
relation to Chopin.—­Chopin goes to Carlsbad.—­At Dresden.—­His
visit to Leipzig:  E. F. Wenzel’s reminiscences; Mendelssohn’s and
Schumann’s remarks on the same event.—­Chopin’s stay at
Heidelberg and return to Paris.

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Frederick Chopin, as a Man and Musician — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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