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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 268 pages of information about Waverley Volume 2.

CHAPTER LI

INTRIGUES OF LOVE AND POLITICS

It is not necessary to record in these pages the triumphant entrance of the Chevalier into Edinburgh after the decisive affair at Preston.  One circumstance, however, may be noticed, because it illustrates the high spirit of Flora Mac-Ivor.  The Highlanders by whom the Prince was surrounded, in the license and extravagance of this joyful moment, fired their pieces repeatedly, and one of these having been accidentally loaded with ball, the bullet grazed the young lady’s temple as she waved her handkerchief from a balcony. [Footnote:  See Note II.] Fergus, who beheld the accident, was at her side in an instant; and, on seeing that the wound was trifling, he drew his broadsword with the purpose of rushing down upon the man by whose carelessness she had incurred so much danger, when, holding him by the plaid, ’Do not harm the poor fellow,’ she cried; ’for Heaven’s sake, do not harm him! but thank God with me that the accident happened to Flora Mac-Ivor; for had it befallen a Whig, they would have pretended that the shot was fired on purpose.’

Waverley escaped the alarm which this accident would have occasioned to him, as he was unavoidably delayed by the necessity of accompanying Colonel Talbot to Edinburgh.

They performed the journey together on horseback, and for some time, as if to sound each other’s feelings and sentiments, they conversed upon general and ordinary topics.

When Waverley again entered upon the subject which he had most at heart, the situation, namely, of his father and his uncle, Colonel Talbot seemed now rather desirous to alleviate than to aggravate his anxiety.  This appeared particularly to be the case when he heard Waverley’s history, which he did not scruple to confide to him.

‘And so,’ said the Colonel,’there has been no malice prepense, as lawyers, I think, term it, in this rash step of yours; and you have been trepanned into the service of this Italian knight-errant by a few civil speeches from him and one or two of his Highland recruiting sergeants?  It is sadly foolish, to be sure, but not nearly so bad as I was led to expect.  However, you cannot desert, even from the Pretender, at the present moment; that seems impossible.  But I have little doubt that, in the dissensions incident to this heterogeneous mass of wild and desperate men, some opportunity may arise, by availing yourself of which you may extricate yourself honourably from your rash engagement before the bubble burst.  If this can be managed, I would have you go to a place of safety in Flanders which I shall point out.  And I think I can secure your pardon from government after a few months’ residence abroad.’

‘I cannot permit you, Colonel Talbot,’ answered Waverley, ’to speak of any plan which turns on my deserting an enterprise in which I may have engaged hastily, but certainly voluntarily, and with the purpose of abiding the issue.’

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