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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 386 pages of information about US Presidential Inaugural Addresses.

THE AMERICAN BELIEF

Under this covenant of justice, liberty, and union we have become a nation—­prosperous, great, and mighty.  And we have kept our freedom.  But we have no promise from God that our greatness will endure.  We have been allowed by Him to seek greatness with the sweat of our hands and the strength of our spirit.

I do not believe that the Great Society is the ordered, changeless, and sterile battalion of the ants.  It is the excitement of becoming—­always becoming, trying, probing, falling, resting, and trying again—­but always trying and always gaining.

In each generation, with toil and tears, we have had to earn our heritage again.

If we fail now, we shall have forgotten in abundance what we learned in hardship:  that democracy rests on faith, that freedom asks more than it gives, and that the judgment of God is harshest on those who are most favored.

If we succeed, it will not be because of what we have, but it will be because of what we are; not because of what we own, but, rather because of what we believe.

For we are a nation of believers.  Underneath the clamor of building and the rush of our day’s pursuits, we are believers in justice and liberty and union, and in our own Union.  We believe that every man must someday be free.  And we believe in ourselves.

Our enemies have always made the same mistake.  In my lifetime—­in depression and in war—­they have awaited our defeat.  Each time, from the secret places of the American heart, came forth the faith they could not see or that they could not even imagine.  It brought us victory.  And it will again.

For this is what America is all about.  It is the uncrossed desert and the unclimbed ridge.  It is the star that is not reached and the harvest sleeping in the unplowed ground.  Is our world gone?  We say “Farewell.”  Is a new world coming?  We welcome it—­and we will bend it to the hopes of man.

To these trusted public servants and to my family and those close friends of mine who have followed me down a long, winding road, and to all the people of this Union and the world, I will repeat today what I said on that sorrowful day in November 1963:  “I will lead and I will do the best I can.”

But you must look within your own hearts to the old promises and to the old dream.  They will lead you best of all.

For myself, I ask only, in the words of an ancient leader:  “Give me now wisdom and knowledge, that I may go out and come in before this people:  for who can judge this thy people, that is so great?”

***

Richard Milhous Nixon
First Inaugural Address
Monday, January 20, 1969

Senator Dirksen, Mr. Chief Justice, Mr. Vice President, President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, my fellow Americans—­and my fellow citizens of the world community: 

I ask you to share with me today the majesty of this moment.  In the orderly transfer of power, we celebrate the unity that keeps us free.

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