US Presidential Inaugural Addresses eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 386 pages of information about US Presidential Inaugural Addresses.

It appears to me that the more important further mandates from the recent election were the maintenance of the integrity of the Constitution; the vigorous enforcement of the laws; the continuance of economy in public expenditure; the continued regulation of business to prevent domination in the community; the denial of ownership or operation of business by the Government in competition with its citizens; the avoidance of policies which would involve us in the controversies of foreign nations; the more effective reorganization of the departments of the Federal Government; the expansion of public works; and the promotion of welfare activities affecting education and the home.

These were the more tangible determinations of the election, but beyond them was the confidence and belief of the people that we would not neglect the support of the embedded ideals and aspirations of America.  These ideals and aspirations are the touchstones upon which the day-to-day administration and legislative acts of government must be tested.  More than this, the Government must, so far as lies within its proper powers, give leadership to the realization of these ideals and to the fruition of these aspirations.  No one can adequately reduce these things of the spirit to phrases or to a catalogue of definitions.  We do know what the attainments of these ideals should be:  The preservation of self-government and its full foundations in local government; the perfection of justice whether in economic or in social fields; the maintenance of ordered liberty; the denial of domination by any group or class; the building up and preservation of equality of opportunity; the stimulation of initiative and individuality; absolute integrity in public affairs; the choice of officials for fitness to office; the direction of economic progress toward prosperity for the further lessening of poverty; the freedom of public opinion; the sustaining of education and of the advancement of knowledge; the growth of religious spirit and the tolerance of all faiths; the strengthening of the home; the advancement of peace.

There is no short road to the realization of these aspirations.  Ours is a progressive people, but with a determination that progress must be based upon the foundation of experience.  Ill-considered remedies for our faults bring only penalties after them.  But if we hold the faith of the men in our mighty past who created these ideals, we shall leave them heightened and strengthened for our children.

CONCLUSION

This is not the time and place for extended discussion.  The questions before our country are problems of progress to higher standards; they are not the problems of degeneration.  They demand thought and they serve to quicken the conscience and enlist our sense of responsibility for their settlement.  And that responsibility rests upon you, my countrymen, as much as upon those of us who have been selected for office.

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US Presidential Inaugural Addresses from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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