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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 386 pages of information about US Presidential Inaugural Addresses.
from domination for all our people, and it is just as essential for the stability and prosperity of business itself as for the protection of the public at large.  Such regulation should be extended by the Federal Government within the limitations of the Constitution and only when the individual States are without power to protect their citizens through their own authority.  On the other hand, we should be fearless when the authority rests only in the Federal Government.

COOPERATION BY THE GOVERNMENT

The larger purpose of our economic thought should be to establish more firmly stability and security of business and employment and thereby remove poverty still further from our borders.  Our people have in recent years developed a new-found capacity for cooperation among themselves to effect high purposes in public welfare.  It is an advance toward the highest conception of self-government.  Self-government does not and should not imply the use of political agencies alone.  Progress is born of cooperation in the community—­not from governmental restraints.  The Government should assist and encourage these movements of collective self-help by itself cooperating with them.  Business has by cooperation made great progress in the advancement of service, in stability, in regularity of employment and in the correction of its own abuses.  Such progress, however, can continue only so long as business manifests its respect for law.

There is an equally important field of cooperation by the Federal Government with the multitude of agencies, State, municipal and private, in the systematic development of those processes which directly affect public health, recreation, education, and the home.  We have need further to perfect the means by which Government can be adapted to human service.

EDUCATION

Although education is primarily a responsibility of the States and local communities, and rightly so, yet the Nation as a whole is vitally concerned in its development everywhere to the highest standards and to complete universality.  Self-government can succeed only through an instructed electorate.  Our objective is not simply to overcome illiteracy.  The Nation has marched far beyond that.  The more complex the problems of the Nation become, the greater is the need for more and more advanced instruction.  Moreover, as our numbers increase and as our life expands with science and invention, we must discover more and more leaders for every walk of life.  We can not hope to succeed in directing this increasingly complex civilization unless we can draw all the talent of leadership from the whole people.  One civilization after another has been wrecked upon the attempt to secure sufficient leadership from a single group or class.  If we would prevent the growth of class distinctions and would constantly refresh our leadership with the ideals of our people, we must draw constantly from the general mass.  The full opportunity for every boy and girl to rise through the selective processes of education can alone secure to us this leadership.

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