Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 94 pages of information about Paste Jewels.

“Very well, Jane,” said Mrs. Perkins; “if that is the way you feel about it we’ll have to part, I suppose.  I am sorry, but—­”

The sentence was not finished, for Jane rushed weeping from the room, and within a few days, her place having been filled, the house knew her no more, except as an occasional visitor, ostensibly to see the children.  Later she got a place to her satisfaction, and one night the Perkins were invited to dine with Jane’s new employers.  They went and found their old-time “butler” at the very zenith of her powers.  She served the dinner as she had never served one in her palmiest days in the Perkins’s dining-room; and when all was over, and when Mrs. Perkins went up-stairs to don her wrap to return home, she found Jane above waiting to help her.

“I am glad to see you so happy, Jane,” she said, as the girl held her cloak.

“Ah, ma’am, I’m not very happy.”

“You ought to be, here.  Your work to-night was perfect.”

“Yes,” said Jane, “it had to be, for”—­here her voice fell to a whisper—­“I don’t dare let it be different, ma’am.  Mrs. Harkins is a regular divvle, and the ould gentleman—­well, ma’am, he do swear finer ’n any gentleman I ever met.  It’s just the place for me.”

And Jane sighed as her old mistress left her.

“Wasn’t she great, Bess?” said Thaddeus, on the way home.

“She was, indeed,” replied Mrs. Perkins, with a smile.  “It’s a pity I’m not a divvle.”

Thaddeus laughed.  “That’s so,” he said; “or that I never learned to swear like a gentleman, eh?”

***End of the project gutenberg EBOOK paste jewels***

******* This file should be named 4930.txt or 4930.zip *******

This and all associated files of various formats will be found in:  http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/4/9/3/4930

Updated editions will replace the previous one—­the old editions will be renamed.

Creating the works from public domain print editions means that no one owns a United States copyright in these works, so the Foundation (and you!) can copy and distribute it in the United States without permission and without paying copyright royalties.  Special rules, set forth in the General Terms of Use part of this license, apply to copying and distributing Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works to protect the project gutenberg-tm concept and trademark.  Project Gutenberg is a registered trademark, and may not be used if you charge for the eBooks, unless you receive specific permission.  If you do not charge anything for copies of this eBook, complying with the rules is very easy.  You may use this eBook for nearly any purpose such as creation of derivative works, reports, performances and research.  They may be modified and printed and given away—­you may do practically anything with public domain eBooks.  Redistribution is subject to the trademark license, especially commercial redistribution.

Follow Us on Facebook