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Thomas Bulfinch
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 980 pages of information about The Age of Fable.

After Belinus and Brennus there reigned several kings of little note, and then came Elidure.  Arthgallo, his brother, being king, gave great offence to his powerful nobles, who rose against him, deposed him, and advanced Elidure to the throne.  Arthgallo fled, and endeavored to find assistance in the neighboring kingdoms to reinstate him, but found none.  Elidure reigned prosperously and wisely.  After five years’ possession of the kingdom, one day, when hunting, he met in the forest his brother, Arthgallo, who had been deposed.  After long wandering, unable longer to bear the poverty to which he was reduced, he had returned to Britain, with only ten followers, designing to repair to those who had formerly been his friends.  Elidure, at the sight of his brother in distress, forgetting all animosities, ran to him, and embraced him.  He took Arthgallo home with him, and concealed him in the palace.  After this he feigned himself sick, and, calling his nobles about him, induced them, partly by persuasion, partly by force, to consent to his abdicating the kingdom, and reinstating his brother on the throne.  The agreement being ratified, Elidure took the crown from his own head, and put it on his brother’s head.  Arthgallo after this reigned ten years, well and wisely, exercisng strict justice towards all men.

He died, and left the kingdom to his sons, who reigned with various fortunes, but were not long-lived, and left no offspring, so that Elidure was again advanced to the throne, and finished the course of his life in just and virtuous actions, receiving the name of the pious, from the love and admiration of his subjects.

Wordsworth has taken the story of Artegal and Elidure for the subject of a poem, which is No. 2 of “Poems founded on the Affections.”

LUD

After Elidure, the Chronicle names many kings, but none of special note, till we come to Lud, who greatly enlarged Trinovant, his capital, and surrounded it with a wall.  He changed its name, bestowing upon it his own, so that henceforth it was called Lud’s town, afterwards London.  Lud was buried by the gate of the city called after him Ludgate.  He had two sons, but they were not old enough at the time of their father’s death to sustain the cares of government, and therefore their uncle, Caswallaun, or Cassibellaunus, succeeded to the kingdom.  He was a brave and magnificent prince, so that his fame reached to distant countries.

CASSIBELLAUNUS

About this time it happened (as is found in the Roman histories) that Julius Caesar, having subdued Gaul, came to the shore opposite Britain.  And having resolved to add this island also to his conquests, he prepared ships and transported his army across the sea, to the mouth of the River Thames.  Here he was met by Cassibellaun with all his forces, and a battle ensued, in which Nennius, the brother of

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