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Thomas Bulfinch
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 980 pages of information about The Age of Fable.
xiv.  Sir Tristram’s Battle with Sir Launcelot
xv.  The Round Table
XVI.  Sir Palamedes
XVII.  Sir Tristram
XVIII.  Perceval
XIX.  The Sangreal, or Holy Graal
XX.  The Sangreal (Continued)
XXI.  The Sangreal (Continued)
XXII.  Sir Agrivain’s Treason
XXIII.  Morte d’Arthur

THE MABINOGEON

      Introductory Note
   I. The Britons
  ii.  The Lady of the Fountain
 iii.  The Lady of the Fountain (Continued)
  iv.  The Lady of the Fountain (Continued)
   V. Geraint, the Son of Erbin
  VI.  Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued)
 vii.  Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued)
VIII.  Pwyll, Prince of Dyved
  ix.  Branwen, the Daughter of Llyr
   X. Manawyddan
  xi.  Kilwich and Olwen
 XII.  Kilwich and Olwen (Continued)
XIII.  Taliesin

HERO MYTHS OF THE BRITISH RACE

Beowulf
Cuchulain, Champion of Ireland
Hereward the Wake
Robin Hood

LEGENDS OF CHARLEMAGNE

Introduction
The Peers, or Paladins
The Tournament
The Siege of Albracca
Adventures of Rinaldo and Orlando
The Invasion of France
The Invasion of France (Continued)

Bradamante and Rogero
Astolpho and the Enchantress
The Orc
Astolpho’s Adventures continued, and Isabella’s begun. 
Medoro
Orlando Mad
Zerbino and Isabella
Astolpho in Abyssinia
The War in Africa
Rogero and Bradamante
The Battle of Roncesvalles
Rinaldo and Bayard
Death of Rinaldo
Huon of Bordeaux
Huon of Bordeaux (Continued)
Huon of Bordeaux (Continued)
Ogier, the Dane
Ogier, the Dane (Continued)
Ogier, the Dane (Continued)

GLOSSARY

STORIES OF GODS AND HEROES

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

The religions of ancient Greece and Rome are extinct.  The so-called divinities of Olympus have not a single worshipper among living men.  They belong now not to the department of theology, but to those of literature and taste.  There they still hold their place, and will continue to hold it, for they are too closely connected with the finest productions of poetry and art, both ancient and modern, to pass into oblivion.

We propose to tell the stories relating to them which have come down to us from the ancients, and which are alluded to by modern poets, essayists, and orators.  Our readers may thus at the same time be entertained by the most charming fictions which fancy has ever created, and put in possession of information indispensable to every one who would read with intelligence the elegant literature of his own day.

In order to understand these stories, it will be necessary to acquaint ourselves with the ideas of the structure of the universe which prevailed among the Greeks—­the people from whom the Romans, and other nations through them, received their science and religion.

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