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Thomas Bulfinch
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 980 pages of information about The Age of Fable.
are sand grains in my hand.’  Unluckily I forgot to ask for enduring youth.  This also he would have granted, could I have accepted his love, but offended at my refusal, he allowed me to grow old.  My youth and youthful strength fled long ago.  I have lived seven hundred years, and to equal the number of the sand grains I have still to see three hundred springs and three hundred harvests.  My body shrinks up as years increase, and in time, I shall be lost to sight, but my voice will remain, and future ages will respect my sayings.”

These concluding words of the Sibyl alluded to her prophetic power.  In her cave she was accustomed to inscribe on leaves gathered from the trees the names and fates of individuals.  The leaves thus inscribed were arranged in order within the cave, and might be consulted by her votaries.  But if perchance at the opening of the door the wind rushed in and dispersed the leaves the Sibyl gave no aid to restoring them again, and the oracle was irreparably lost.

The following legend of the Sibyl is fixed at a later date.  In the reign of one of the Tarquins there appeared before the king a woman who offered him nine books for sale.  The king refused to purchase them, whereupon the woman went away and burned three of the books, and returning offered the remaining books for the same price she had asked for the nine.  The king again rejected them; but when the woman, after burning three books more, returned and asked for the three remaining the same price which she had before asked for the nine, his curiosity was excited, and he purchased the books.  They were found to contain the destinies of the Roman state.  They were kept in the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, preserved in a stone chest, and allowed to be inspected only by especial officers appointed for that duty, who, on great occasions, consulted them and interpreted their oracles to the people.

There were various Sibyls; but the Cumaean Sibyl, of whom Ovid and Virgil write, is the most celebrated of them.  Ovid’s story of her life protracted to one thousand years may be intended to represent the various Sibyls as being only reappearances of one and the same individual.

Young, in the “Night Thoughts,” alludes to the Sibyl.  Speaking of Worldly Wisdom, he says: 

   “If future fate she plans ’tis all in leaves,
    Like Sibyl, unsubstantial, fleeting bliss;
    At the first blast it vanishes in air.

    As worldly schemes resemble Sibyl’s leaves,
    The good man’s days to Sibyl’s books compare,
    The price still rising as in number less.”

CHAPTER XXXIII

CAMILLA—­EVANDER—­NISUS AND EURYALUS—­MEZENTIUS—­TURNUS

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