The Age of Fable eBook

Thomas Bulfinch
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 980 pages of information about The Age of Fable.

Schiller, in his poem “Die Gotter Griechenlands,” expresses his regret for the overthrow of the beautiful mythology of ancient times in a way which has called forth an answer from a Christian poet, Mrs. E. Barrett Browning, in her poem called “The Dead Pan.”  The two following verses are a specimen: 

“By your beauty which confesses
Some chief Beauty conquering you,
By our grand heroic guesses
Through your falsehood at the True,
We will weep not! earth shall roll
Heir to each god’s aureole,

                            And Pan is dead.

“Earth outgrows the mythic fancies
Sung beside her in her youth;
And those debonaire romances
Sound but dull beside the truth. 
Phoebus’ chariot course is run! 
Look up, poets, to the sun! 

                                  Pan, Pan is dead.”

These lines are founded on an early Christian tradition that when the heavenly host told the shepherds at Bethlehem of the birth of Christ, a deep groan, heard through all the isles of Greece, told that the great Pan was dead, and that all the royalty of Olympus was dethroned and the several deities were sent wandering in cold and darkness.  So Milton in his “Hymn on the Nativity”: 

“The lonely mountains o’er,
And the resounding shore,
A voice of weeping heard and loud lament;
From haunted spring and dale,
Edged with poplar pale,
The parting Genius is with sighing sent;
With flower-enwoven tresses torn,
The nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.”

ERISICHTHON

Erisichthon was a profane person and a despiser of the gods.  On one occasion he presumed to violate with the axe a grove sacred to Ceres.  There stood in this grove a venerable oak so large that it seemed a wood in itself, its ancient trunk towering aloft, whereon votive garlands were often hung and inscriptions carved expressing the gratitude of suppliants to the nymph of the tree.  Often had the Dryads danced round it hand in hand.  Its trunk measured fifteen cubits round, and it overtopped the other trees as they overtopped the shrubbery.  But for all that, Erisichthon saw no reason why he should spare it and he ordered his servants to cut it down.  When he saw them hesitate he snatched an axe from one, and thus impiously exclaimed:  “I care not whether it be a tree beloved of the goddess or not; were it the goddess herself it should come down if it stood in my way.”  So saying, he lifted the axe and the oak seemed to shudder and utter a groan.  When the first blow fell upon the trunk blood flowed from the wound.  All the bystanders were horror-struck, and one of them ventured to remonstrate and hold back the fatal axe.  Erisichthon, with a scornful look, said to him, “Receive the reward of your piety;” and turned against him the weapon which he had held aside from the tree, gashed his body with many wounds, and cut off his head.  Then from the midst of the oak came a voice, “I who dwell in this tree am a nymph beloved of Ceres, and dying by your hands forewarn you that punishment awaits you.”  He desisted not from his crime, and at last the tree, sundered by repeated blows and drawn by ropes, fell with a crash and prostrated a great part of the grove in its fall.

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The Age of Fable from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.