The Age of Chivalry eBook

Thomas Bulfinch
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 350 pages of information about The Age of Chivalry.
you that he be well kept till God bring him back again.”  And after twenty-four days he opened his eyes; and when he saw folk he made great sorrow, and said, “Why have ye wakened me? for I was better at ease than I am now.”  “What have ye seen?” said they about him.  “I have seen,” said he, “great marvels that no tongue can tell, and more than any heart can think.”  Then they said, “Sir, the quest of the Sangreal is achieved right now in you, and never shall ye see more of it than ye have seen.”  “I thank God,” said Sir Launcelot, “of his great mercy, for that I have seen, for it sufficeth me.”  Then he rose up and clothed himself; and when he was so arrayed they marvelled all, for they knew it was Sir Launcelot the good knight.  And after four days he took his leave of the lord of the castle, and of all the fellowship that were there, and thanked them for their great labor and care of him.  Then he departed, and turned to Camelot, where he found King Arthur and Queen Guenever; but many of the knights of the Round Table were slain and destroyed, more than half.  Then all the court was passing glad of Sir Launcelot; and he told the king all his adventures that had befallen him since he departed.

SIR GALAHAD

Now, when Sir Galahad had rescued Perceval from the twenty knights, he rode into a vast forest, wherein he abode many days.  Then he took his way to the sea, and it befell him that he was benighted in a hermitage.  And the good man was glad when he saw he was a knight-errant.  And when they were at rest, there came a gentlewoman knocking at the door; and the good man came to the door to wit what she would.  Then she said, “I would speak with the knight which is with you.”  Then Galahad went to her, and asked her what she would.  “Sir Galahad,” said she, “I will that ye arm you, and mount upon your horse, and follow me; for I will show you the highest adventure that ever knight saw.”  Then Galahad armed himself and commended himself to God, and bade the damsel go before, and he would follow where she led.

So she rode as fast as her palfrey might bear her, till she came to the sea; and there they found the ship where Sir Bohort and Sir Perceval were, who cried from the ship, “Sir Galahad, you are welcome; we have waited you long.”  And when he heard them, he asked the damsel who they were.  “Sir,” said she, “leave your horse here, and I shall leave mine, and we will join ourselves to their company.”  So they entered into the ship, and the two knights received them both with great joy.  For they knew the damsel, that she was Sir Perceval’s sister.  Then the wind arose and drove them through the sea all that day and the next, till the ship arrived between two rocks, passing great and marvellous; but there they might not land, for there was a whirlpool; but there was another ship, and upon it they might go without danger.  “Go we thither,” said the gentlewoman, “and there we shall see

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The Age of Chivalry from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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