The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 897 pages of information about The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford Volume 4.
the Guido and the portrait of Madame de la Vali`ere as a Magdalen; the Val de Grace, for a moment; the treasure at Notre Dame; the Sainte Chapelle, where in the ante-chapel are two very large enamelled portraits; the tomb of Cond`e at the Great Jesuits in the Rue St. Antoine, if not shut up; and the little church of St. Louis in the Louvre, where is a fine tomb of Cardinal Fleury, but large enough to stand on Salisbury-plain.  One thing some of u must remember, as you return; nay, it is better to go soon to St. Denis, and Madame du Deffand must get you a particular order to be shown (which is never shown without) the effigies of the Kings.(142) They are in presses over the treasure which is shown, and where is the glorious antique cameo-cup; but the countenance of Charles ix. is so horrid and remarkable, you would think he had died on the morrow of the St. Barthelemi, and waked full of the recollection.  If you love enamels and exquisite medals, get to see the collection of a Monsieur d’Henery, who lives in the corner of the street where Sir John Lambert lives—­I forget its name.  There is an old man behind the Rue de Colombier, who has a great but bad collection of old French portraits; I delighted in them, but perhaps you would not.  I, you may be sure, hunted out every thing of that sort.  The convent and collection of St. Germain, I mean that over against the H`otel du Parc Royal, is well worth seeing—­but I forget names strangely—­Oh! delightful!—­Lord Cholmondeley sends me word he goes to Paris on Monday:  I shall send this and my other letter by him.  It was him I meant; I knew he was going and had prepared it.

Pray take care to lock up your papers in a strong box that nobody can open.  They imagine you are at Paris on some commission, and there is no trusting French hotels or servants.  America is in a desperate situation, The accounts from the Congress are not expected before the 10th, and expected very warm.  I have not time to tell you some manoeuvres against them that will make your blood curdle.  Write to me when you can by private hands, as I will to you.  There are always English passing backwards and forwards.

(140) Where Madame de S`evign`e resided.

(141) He means from their extreme bad taste.

(142) The abbey of St. Denis was shorn of its glories during the Revolution.  On the 16th of October 1793, the coffin of Louis xv. was taken out of the vaults; and, after a stormy debate, it was decided to throw the remains of all the kings, even those of Henry iv. and Louis XIV. which were yet to a great degree preserved entire, into a pit, to melt down their leaden coffins on the spot, and to take away and cast into bullets whatever lead remained in the church; not even excepting the roof.-E.

Letter 78 To The Countess Of Ailesbury.  Strawberry Hill, Nov. 7, 1774. (page 110)

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