Rise of the Dutch Republic, the — Volume 21: 1573-74 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 88 pages of information about Rise of the Dutch Republic, the — Volume 21.

Title:  The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1573-74

Author:  John Lothrop Motley

Release Date:  January, 2004 [EBook #4822] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on March 19, 2002]

Edition:  10

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

*** Start of the project gutenberg EBOOK the Dutch Republic, 1573-74 ***

This eBook was produced by David Widger widger@cecomet.net

[Note:  There is a short list of bookmarks, or pointers, at the end of the file for those who may wish to sample the author’s ideas before making an entire meal of them.  D.W.]

MOTLEY’S HISTORY OF THE NETHERLANDS, PG EDITION, VOLUME 22.

THE RISE OF THE DUTCH REPUBLIC

By John Lothrop Motley

1855

ADMINISTRATION OF THE GRAND COMMANDER

PART IV.

1573-74 [Chapter I.]

Previous career of Requesens—­Philip’s passion for detail—­Apparent and real purposes of government—­Universal desire for peace—­ Correspondence of leading royalists with Orange—­Bankruptcy of the exchequer at Alva’s departures—­Expensive nature of the war—­ Pretence of mildness on the part of the Commander—­His private views—­Distress of Mondragon at Middelburg—­Crippled condition of Holland—­Orange’s secret negotiations with France—­St. Aldegonde’s views in captivity—­Expedition to relieve Middelburg—­Counter preparations of Orange—­Defeat of the expedition—­Capitulation of Mondragon—­Plans of Orange and his brothers—­An army under Count Louis crosses the Rhine—­Measures taken by Requesens—­Manoeuvres of Avila and of Louis—­The two armies in face at Mook—­Battle of Mook- heath—­Overthrow and death of Count Louis—­The phantom battle—­ Character of Louis of Nassau—­Painful uncertainty as to his fate—­ Periodical mutinies of the Spanish troops characterized—­Mutiny after the battle of Mook—­Antwerp attacked and occupied,—­Insolent and oppressive conduct of the mutineers—­Offers of Requesens refused—­Mutiny in the citadel—­Exploits of Salvatierra—­Terms of composition—­Soldiers’ feast on the mere—­Successful expedition of Admiral Boisot

The horrors of Alva’s administration had caused men to look back with fondness upon the milder and more vacillating tyranny of the Duchess Margaret.  From the same cause the advent of the Grand Commander was hailed with pleasure and with a momentary gleam of hope.  At any rate, it was a relief that the man in whom an almost impossible perfection of cruelty seemed embodied was at last to be withdrawn. it was certain that his successor, however ambitious of following in Alva’s footsteps, would never be able to rival the intensity and the unswerving directness of purpose which it had been permitted to the Duke’s nature to attain.  The new Governor-General was, doubtless, human, and it had been long since the Netherlanders imagined anything in common between themselves and the late Viceroy.

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Rise of the Dutch Republic, the — Volume 21: 1573-74 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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