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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 571 pages of information about The Complete Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume 1.
690
Are done and said i’ the world, and many worms
And beasts and men live on, and mighty Earth
From sea and mountain, city and wilderness,
In vesper low or joyous orison,
Lifts still its solemn voice:—­but thou art fled—­ 695
Thou canst no longer know or love the shapes
Of this phantasmal scene, who have to thee
Been purest ministers, who are, alas! 
Now thou art not.  Upon those pallid lips
So sweet even in their silence, on those eyes
700
That image sleep in death, upon that form
Yet safe from the worm’s outrage, let no tear
Be shed—­not even in thought.  Nor, when those hues
Are gone, and those divinest lineaments,
Worn by the senseless wind, shall live alone 705
In the frail pauses of this simple strain,
Let not high verse, mourning the memory
Of that which is no more, or painting’s woe
Or sculpture, speak in feeble imagery
Their own cold powers.  Art and eloquence,
710
And all the shows o’ the world are frail and vain
To weep a loss that turns their lights to shade. 
It is a woe “too deep for tears,” when all
Is reft at once, when some surpassing Spirit,
Whose light adorned the world around it, leaves 715
Those who remain behind, not sobs or groans,
The passionate tumult of a clinging hope;
But pale despair and cold tranquillity,
Nature’s vast frame, the web of human things,
Birth and the grave, that are not as they were.
720

Notes:  219 Conduct edition 1816.  See “Editor’s Notes”. 530 roots edition 1816:  query stumps or trunks.  See “Editor’s Notes”.

NOTE ON ALASTOR, BY MRS. SHELLEY.

“Alastor” is written in a very different tone from “Queen Mab”.  In the latter, Shelley poured out all the cherished speculations of his youth—­all the irrepressible emotions of sympathy, censure, and hope, to which the present suffering, and what he considers the proper destiny of his fellow-creatures, gave birth.  “Alastor”, on the contrary, contains an individual interest only.  A very few years, with their attendant events, had checked the ardour of Shelley’s hopes, though he still thought them well-grounded, and that to advance their fulfilment was the noblest task man could achieve.

This is neither the time nor place to speak of the misfortunes that chequered his life.  It will be sufficient to say that, in all he did, he at the time of doing it believed himself justified to his own conscience; while the various ills of poverty and loss of friends brought home to him the sad realities of life.  Physical suffering had also considerable influence in causing him to turn his eyes inward; inclining him rather to brood over the thoughts and emotions of his own soul than to glance abroad, and

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