In Freedom's Cause : a Story of Wallace and Bruce eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 353 pages of information about In Freedom's Cause .

Chapter V A Treacherous Plot

So rapid was the advance of Wallace’s army that the English had scarce time to form when they were upon them.  The Scotch charged with extreme impetuosity among the English ranks, directing the onslaught principally against the centre, commanded by the Earl of Kent.

The English resisted stoutly; but the Earl of Kent was struck down by Wallace himself, and was with difficulty borne off the field; and after severe fighting, the whole English army was thrown into disorder and took to flight.  Some hundreds were killed in action, and many more in the pursuit which followed; this, however, Wallace would not allow to be pushed too far lest the fugitives should rally and turn.  Then the victorious Scots returned to the English camp.  In this was found a great abundance of provisions, arms, and other valuable booty.  Many of the cattle were killed, and a sumptuous feast prepared.  Then Wallace had the whole of the spoil carried off into a place of safety in the heart of a neighbouring bog, and he himself fell back to that shelter.

In the morning the English, who had rallied when the pursuit had ceased, again advanced, hoping to find Wallace unprepared.  They were now commanded by the Earl of Lancaster, and had received some reinforcements in the night.  They passed over the scene of the previous day’s battle, and at last came in sight of the Scotch army.  Wallace at first advanced, and then, as if dismayed at their superior strength, retired to the point where, in order to reach them, the English would have to cross a portion of the bog.  The surface was covered with moss and long grass, and the treacherous nature of the ground was unperceived by the English, who, filled with desire to wipe out their defeat of the preceding day, charged impetuously against the Scotch line.  The movement was fatal, for as soon as they reached the treacherous ground their horses sunk to the saddle girths.  The Scotch had dismounted on firmer ground behind, and now advanced to the attack, some working round the flanks of the morass, others crossing on tufts of grass, and so fell upon the struggling mass of English.  The Earl of Westmoreland and many others of note were killed, and the Earl of Lancaster, with the remains of his force, at once retreated south and recrossed the Border.

Archie had taken no part in the first battle.  Wallace had asked him whether he would fight by his side or take command of a body of infantry; and he chose the latter alternative.  Almost all the knights and gentlemen were fighting on horse with their followers, and Archie thought that if these were repulsed the brunt of the fray would fall upon the infantry.  On this occasion, then, he gathered with his band of lads a hundred or so pikemen, and formed them in order, exhorting them, whatever happened, to keep together and to stand stoutly, even against a charge of horse.  As the victory was won entirely by the cavalry he had no opportunity of distinguishing himself.  Upon the second day, however, he did good service, as he and his lightly armed footmen were able to cross the bog in places impracticable to the dismounted men-at-arms in their heavy accoutrements.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
In Freedom's Cause : a Story of Wallace and Bruce from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook