In Freedom's Cause : a Story of Wallace and Bruce eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 353 pages of information about In Freedom's Cause .

As he neared the gates of Lanark he saw a party issue out and ride towards him, and recognized in their leader Sir John Kerr.  Pulling his cap down over his eyes, he strode forward, keeping by the side of the road that the horsemen might pass freely, but paying no heed to them otherwise.

“Hallo, sirrah!” Sir John exclaimed, reining in his horse, “who are you who pass a knight and a gentleman on the highway without vailing his bonnet in respect?”

“I am a gentleman and the son of a knight,” Archie said, looking fearlessly up into the face of his questioner.  “I am Archie Forbes, and I vail my bonnet to no man living save those whom I respect and honour.”

So saying, without another word he strode forward to the town.  Sir John looked darkly after him.

“Red Roy,” he said sternly, turning to one who rode behind him, “you have failed in your trust.  I told you to watch the boy, and from time to time you brought me news that he was growing up but a village churl.  He is no churl, and unless I mistake me, he will some day be dangerous.  Let me know when he next returns to the village; we must then take speedy steps for preventing him from becoming troublesome.”

Chapter III Sir William Wallace

Archie’s coming had been expected by Sir Robert Gordon, and he was warmly welcomed.  He had once or twice a year paid short visits to the house, but his mother could not bring herself to part with him for more than a few days at a time; and so long as he needed only such rudiments of learning as were deemed useful at the time, she herself was fully able to teach them; but now that the time had come when it was needful that he should be perfected in the exercises of arms, she felt it necessary to relinquish him.

Sir Robert Gordon had no children of his own, and regarded his nephew as his heir, and had readily undertaken to provide him with the best instruction which could be obtained in Lanark.  There was resident in the town a man who had served for many years in the army of the King of France, and had been master of arms in his regiment.  His skill with his sword was considered marvellous by his countrymen at Lanark, for the scientific use of weapons was as yet but little known in Scotland, and he had also in several trials of skill easily worsted the best swordsmen in the English garrison.

Sir Robert Gordon at once engaged this man as instructor to Archie.  As his residence was three miles from the town, and the lad urged that two or three hours a day of practice would by no means satisfy him, a room was provided, and his instructor took up his abode in the castle.  Here, from early morning until night, Archie practised, with only such intervals for rest as were demanded by his master himself.  The latter, pleased with so eager a pupil, astonished at first at the skill and strength which he already possessed, and seeing in him one who would do more than justice to all pains that he could bestow upon him, grudged no labour in bringing him forward and in teaching him all he knew.

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In Freedom's Cause : a Story of Wallace and Bruce from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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