Work: a Story of Experience eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 359 pages of information about Work.

Uncle Enos never could forgive her for this piece of folly, and Christie plainly saw that one of three things would surely happen, if she lived on there with no vent for her full heart and busy mind.  She would either marry Joe Butterfield in sheer desperation, and become a farmer’s household drudge; settle down into a sour spinster, content to make butter, gossip, and lay up money all her days; or do what poor Matty Stone had done, try to crush and curb her needs and aspirations till the struggle grew too hard, and then in a fit of despair end her life, and leave a tragic story to haunt their quiet river.

To escape these fates but one way appeared; to break loose from this narrow life, go out into the world and see what she could do for herself.  This idea was full of enchantment to the eager girl, and, after much earnest thought, she had resolved to try it.

“If I fail, I can come back,” she said to herself, even while she scorned the thought of failure, for with all her shy pride she was both brave and ardent, and her dreams were of the rosiest sort.

“I won’t marry Joe; I won’t wear myself out in a district-school for the mean sum they give a woman; I won’t delve away here where I’m not wanted; and I won’t end my life like a coward, because it is dull and hard.  I’ll try my fate as mother did, and perhaps I may succeed as well.”  And Christie’s thoughts went wandering away into the dim, sweet past when she, a happy child, lived with loving parents in a different world from that.

Lost in these tender memories, she sat till the old moon-faced clock behind the door struck twelve, then the visions vanished, leaving their benison behind them.

As she glanced backward at the smouldering fire, a slender spire of flame shot up from the log that had blazed so cheerily, and shone upon her as she went.  A good omen, gratefully accepted then, and remembered often in the years to come.

CHAPTER II.

Servant.

A fortnight later, and Christie was off.  Mrs. Flint had briefly answered that she had a room, and that work was always to be found in the city.  So the girl packed her one trunk, folding away splendid hopes among her plain gowns, and filling every corner with happy fancies, utterly impossible plans, and tender little dreams, so lovely at the time, so pathetic to remember, when contact with the hard realities of life has collapsed our bright bubbles, and the frost of disappointment nipped all our morning glories in their prime.  The old red stage stopped at Enos Devon’s door, and his niece crossed the threshold after a cool handshake with the master of the house, and a close embrace with the mistress, who stood pouring out last words with spectacles too dim for seeing.  Fat Ben swung up the trunk, slammed the door, mounted his perch, and the ancient vehicle swayed with premonitory symptoms of departure.

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Work: a Story of Experience from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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