The Valley of Silent Men eBook

James Oliver Curwood
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 227 pages of information about The Valley of Silent Men.

The tableau, as it presented itself about his bedside now, amused him.  Its humor was grim, but even in these last hours of his life he appreciated it.  He had always more or less regarded life as a joke—­a very serious joke, but a joke for all that—­a whimsical and trickful sort of thing played by the Great Arbiter on humanity at large; and this last count in his own life, as it was solemnly and tragically ticking itself off, was the greatest joke of all.  The amazed faces that stared at him, their passing moments of disbelief, their repressed but at times visible betrayals of horror, the steadiness of their eyes, the tenseness of their lips —­all added to what he might have called, at another time, the dramatic artistry of his last great adventure.

That he was dying did not chill him, or make him afraid, or put a tremble into his voice.  The contemplation of throwing off the mere habit of breathing had never at any stage of his thirty-six years of life appalled him.  Those years, because he had spent a sufficient number of them in the raw places of the earth, had given him a philosophy and viewpoint of his own, both of which he kept unto himself without effort to impress them on other people.  He believed that life itself was the cheapest thing on the face of all the earth.  All other things had their limitations.

There was so much water and so much land, so many mountains and so many plains, so many square feet to live on and so many square feet to be buried in.  All things could be measured, and stood up, and catalogued—­except life itself.  “Given time,” he would say, “a single pair of humans can populate all creation.”  Therefore, being the cheapest of all things, it was true philosophy that life should be the easiest of all things to give up when the necessity came.

Which is only another way of emphasizing that Kent was not, and never had been, afraid to die.  But it does not say that he treasured life a whit less than the man in another room, who, a day or so before, had fought like a lunatic before going under an anesthetic for the amputation of a bad finger.  No man had loved life more than he.  No man had lived nearer it.

It had been a passion with him.  Full of dreams, and always with anticipations ahead, no matter how far short realizations fell, he was an optimist, a lover of the sun and the moon and the stars, a worshiper of the forests and of the mountains, a man who loved his life, and who had fought for it, and yet who was ready—­at the last—­to yield it up without a whimper when the fates asked for it.

Bolstered up against his pillows, he did not look the part of the fiend he was confessing himself to be to the people about him.  Sickness had not emaciated him.  The bronze of his lean, clean-cut face had faded a little, but the tanning of wind and sun and campfire was still there.  His blue eyes were perhaps dulled somewhat by the nearness of death.  One would not have judged him to be thirty-six, even though over one temple there was a streak of gray in his blond hair—­a heritage from his mother, who was dead.  Looking at him, as his lips quietly and calmly confessed himself beyond the pale of men’s sympathy or forgiveness, one would have said that his crime was impossible.

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The Valley of Silent Men from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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