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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 367 pages of information about Yama.

Somehow it came about of itself, that on the ruins of those ancient, long-warmed nests, where of yore the rosy-cheeked, sprightly wives of the soldiery and the plump widows of Yama, with their black eyebrows, had secretly traded in vodka and free love, there began to spring up wide-open brothels, permitted by the authorities, regulated by official supervision and subject to express, strict rules.  Towards the end of the nineteenth century both streets of Yama—­Great Yamskaya and Little Yamskaya—­proved to be entirely occupied, on one side of the street as well as the other, exclusively with houses of ill-fame. [Footnote:  “Houses of Suffrance”—­i.e., Houses of the Necessary Evil.—­Trans.] Of the private houses no more than five or six were left, but even they were taken up by public houses, beer halls, and general stores, catering to the needs of Yama prostitution.

The course of life, the manners and customs, are almost identical in all the thirty-odd establishments; the difference is only in the charges exacted for the briefly-timed love, and consequently in certain external minutiae as well:  in the assortment of more or less handsome women, in the comparative smartness of the costumes, in the magnificence of the premises and the luxuriousness of the furnishings.

The most chic establishment is that of Treppel, the first house to the left upon entering Great Yamskaya.  This is an old firm.  Its present owner bears an entirely different name, and fills the post of an elector in the city council and is even a member of the city board.  The house is of two stories, green and white, built in the debauched pseudo-Russian style a la Ropetovsky, with little horses, carved facings, roosters, and wooden towels bordered with lace-also of wood; a carpet with a white runner on the stairs; in the front hall a stuffed bear, holding a wooden platter for visiting cards in his out-stretched paws; a parquet floor in the ballroom, heavy raspberry silk curtains and tulle on the windows, along the walls white and gold chairs and mirrors with gilt frames; there are two private cabinets with carpets, divans, and soft satin puffs; in the bedrooms blue and rose lanterns, blankets of raw silk stuff and clean pillows; the inmates are clad in low-cut ball gowns, bordered with fur, or in expensive masquerade costumes of hussars, pages, fisher lasses, school-girls; and the majority of them are Germans from the Baltic provinces—­large, handsome women, white of body and with ample breasts.  At Treppel’s three roubles are taken for a visit, and for the whole night, ten.

Three of the two-rouble establishments—­Sophie Vassilievna’s, The Old Kiev, and Anna Markovna’s—­are somewhat worse, somewhat poorer.  The remaining houses on Great Yamskaya are rouble ones; they are furnished still worse.  While on Little Yamskaya, which is frequented by soldiers, petty thieves, artisans, and drab folk In general, and where fifty kopecks or less are taken for time, things are altogether

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