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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 367 pages of information about Yama.

Title:  Yama (The Pit)

Author:  Alexandra Kuprin

Release Date:  December, 2003 [Etext #4706] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on March 5, 2002]

Edition:  10

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

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YAMA [THE PIT]

Of this edition, intended for private circulation only, and printed from type on Berkeley Antique laid paper, 950 copies have been printed for America, and 550 for Great Britain.  Also, 55 unnumbered copies, for the press.

This copy is Number 223

YAMA [THE PIT]

A NOVEL IN THREE PARTS

BY ALEXANDRA KUPRIN

TRANSLATED FROM THE RUSSIAN

BY BERNARD GUILBERT GUERNEY

“All the horror is in just this, that there is no horror ...”

AUTHOR’S DEDICATION

I know that many will find this novel immoral and indecent; nevertheless, I dedicate it with all my heart to mothers and youths—­A.  K.

TRANSLATOR’S DEDICATION

I dedicate the labour of translation, in all humility and sincerity, to K. Andrae.  B. G. G.

INTRODUCTION

“With us, you see,” Kuprin makes the reporter Platonov, his mouthpiece, say in Yama, “they write about detectives, about lawyers, about inspectors of the revenue, about pedagogues, about attorneys, about the police, about officers, about sensual ladies, about engineers, about baritones—­and really, by God, altogether well—­cleverly, with finesse and talent.  But, after all, all these people are rubbish, and their life is not life, but some sort of conjured up, spectral, unnecessary delirium of world culture.  But there are two singular realities—­ancient as humanity itself:  the prostitute and the moujik.  And about them we know nothing, save some tinsel, gingerbread, debauched depictions in literature...”

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