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Famous Affinities of History — Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 411 pages of information about Famous Affinities of History Complete.

As to the scene, it must be remembered that the Egypt of those days was not Egyptian as we understand the word, but rather Greek.  Cleopatra herself was of Greek descent.  The kingdom of Egypt had been created by a general of Alexander the Great after that splendid warrior’s death.  Its capital, the most brilliant city of the Greco-Roman world, had been founded by Alexander himself, who gave to it his name.  With his own hands he traced out the limits of the city and issued the most peremptory orders that it should be made the metropolis of the entire world.  The orders of a king cannot give enduring greatness to a city; but Alexander’s keen eye and marvelous brain saw at once that the site of Alexandria was such that a great commercial community planted there would live and flourish throughout out succeeding ages.  He was right; for within a century this new capital of Egypt leaped to the forefront among the exchanges of the world’s commerce, while everything that art could do was lavished on its embellishment.

Alexandria lay upon a projecting tongue of land so situated that the whole trade of the Mediterranean centered there.  Down the Nile there floated to its gates the barbaric wealth of Africa.  To it came the treasures of the East, brought from afar by caravans—­ silks from China, spices and pearls from India, and enormous masses of gold and silver from lands scarcely known.  In its harbor were the vessels of every country, from Asia in the East to Spain and Gaul and even Britain in the West.

When Cleopatra, a young girl of seventeen, succeeded to the throne of Egypt the population of Alexandria amounted to a million souls.  The customs duties collected at the port would, in terms of modern money, amount each year to more than thirty million dollars, even though the imposts were not heavy.  The people, who may be described as Greek at the top and Oriental at the bottom, were boisterous and pleasure-loving, devoted to splendid spectacles, with horse-racing, gambling, and dissipation; yet at the same time they were an artistic people, loving music passionately, and by no means idle, since one part of the city was devoted to large and prosperous manufactories of linen, paper, glass, and muslin.

To the outward eye Alexandria was extremely beautiful.  Through its entire length ran two great boulevards, shaded and diversified by mighty trees and parterres of multicolored flowers, amid which fountains plashed and costly marbles gleamed.  One-fifth of the whole city was known as the Royal Residence.  In it were the palaces of the reigning family, the great museum, and the famous library which the Arabs later burned.  There were parks and gardens brilliant with tropical foliage and adorned with the masterpieces of Grecian sculpture, while sphinxes and obelisks gave a suggestion of Oriental strangeness.  As one looked seaward his eye beheld over the blue water the snow-white rocks of the sheltering island, Pharos,

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