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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 262 pages of information about Manuel Pereira.
of his feelings.  And then, how could he get word to his Captain?  If they were so cruel to him now, he could not expect them to be less so in the morning.  In this manner, he sat down upon the floor with the poor negro, and, if he could do nothing more, sympathized with his feelings.  The poor negro murmured and groaned in a manner that would have enlisted the feelings of a Patagonian; and in this way he continued until about three o’clock in the morning, when his moaning became so loud and pitiful, that the officer of the guard came to the door with an attendant, and unbolting it, entered with a lantern in his hand.  He held the light toward his face, and inquired what he was making such a noise about?  “Oh! good massa, good massa, do send for docta; ma head got a pile o’ cuts on him,” said he, putting his hand to his head.  The officer passed the lantern to his attendant, and after putting a pair of gloves on his hands, began to feel his head, turn aside his torn clothes, and wipe the dirt from the places where the blood seemed to be clotted.  “Good gracious!  I didn’t conjecture that you were cut so bad.  Here, my good fellow, (addressing himself to Tommy,) hold the lantern.  Michael, go get a pail of water, and some cloths,” said he, very suddenly becoming awakened to the real condition of the man, after he had exhibited a coldness that bordered on brutality.

Water and cloths were soon brought.  The attendant, Michael, commenced to strip his clothes off, but the poor fellow was so sore that he screeched, in the greatest agony, every time he attempted to touch him.  “Be easy,” said the officer, “he’s hurt pretty badly.  He must a’ been mighty refractory, or they’d never beaten him in this manner,” he continued, opening a roll of adhesive plaster, and cutting it into strips.  After washing, him with water and whiskey, they dressed his wounds with the plaster, and bound his head with an old silk handkerchief which they found in his pocket, after which they left the light burning and retired.

After they retired, Tommy inquired of the negro how they came to keep him so long, before they brought him to the guard-house?  It proved, that as soon as they came up with him, the first one knocked him down with a club; and they all at once commenced beating him with their bludgeons, and continued until they had satisfied their mad fury.  And while he lay groaning in the streets, they left one of their number in charge, while the others proceeded to get handcuffs and chains, in which they bound him, and dragged him, as it were, the distance of four squares to the guard-house.  What a sublime picture for the meditations of a people who boast of their bravery and generosity!

CHAPTER XIX.

The next morning, and the mayor’s verdict.

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