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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 101 pages of information about Lady Hester, or, Ursula's Narrative.

CHAPTER I. SAULT ST. PIERRE.

I write this by desire of my brothers and sisters, that if any reports of our strange family history should come down to after generations the thing may be properly understood.

The old times at Trevorsham seem to me so remote, that I can hardly believe that we are the same who were so happy then.  Nay, Jaquetta laughs, and declares that it is not possible to be happier than we have been since, and Fulk would have me remember that all was not always smooth even in those days.

Perhaps not—­for him, at least, dear fellow, in those latter times; but when I think of the old home, the worst troubles that rise before me are those of the back-board and the stocks, French in the school-room, and Miss Simmonds’ “Lady Ursula, think of your position!”

And as to Jaquetta, she was born under a more benignant star.  Nobody could have put a back-board on her any more than on a kitten.

Our mother had died (oh! how happily for herself!) when Jaquetta was a baby, and Miss Simmonds most carefully ruled not only over us, but over Adela Brainerd, my father’s ward, who was brought up with us because she had no other relation in the world.

Besides, my father wished her to marry one of my brothers.  It would have done very well for either Torwood or Bertram, but unluckily, as it seemed, neither of them could take to the notion.  She was a dear little thing, to be sure, and we were all very fond of her; but, as Bertram said, it would have been like marrying Jaquetta, and Torwood had other views, to which my father would not then listen.

Then Bertram’s regiment was ordered to Canada, and that was the real cause of it all, though we did not know it till long after.

Bertram was starting out on a sporting expedition with a Canadian gentleman, when about ten miles from Montreal they halted at a farm with a good well-built house, named Sault St. Pierre, all looking prosperous and comfortable, and a young farmer, American in his ways--free-spoken, familiar, and blunt—­but very kindly and friendly, was at work there with some French-Canadian labourers.

Bertram’s friend knew him and often halted there on hunting expeditions, so they went into the house—­very nicely furnished, a pretty parlour with muslin curtains, a piano, and everything pleasant; and Joel Lea called his wife, a handsome, fair young woman.  Bertram says from the first she put him in mind of some one, and he was trying to make out who it could be.  Then came the wife’s mother, a neat little delicate, bent woman, with dark eyes, that looked, Bertram said, as if they had had some great fright and never recovered it.  They called her Mrs. Dayman.

She was silent at first, and only helped her daughter and the maid to get the dinner, and an excellent dinner it was; but she kept on looking at Bertram, and she quite started when she heard him called Mr. Trevor.  When they were just rising up, and going to take leave, she came up to him in a frightened agitated manner, as if she could not help it, and said—­

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