California Romantic and Resourceful; : a plea for the collection, preservation and diffusion of information relating to Pacific coast history eBook

John Francis Davis
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 46 pages of information about California Romantic and Resourceful; .

So each year the seasons shifted, — wet and warm and drear and dry;
Half a year of clouds and flowers, half a year of dust and sky.

Still it brought no ship nor message, — brought no tidings, ill or meet,
For the statesmanlike Commander, for the daughter fair and sweet.

Yet she heard the varying message, voiceless to all ears beside:  “He will come,” the flowers whispered; “Come no more,” the dry hills sighed.

Still she found him with the waters lifted by the morning breeze, —
Still she lost him with the folding of the great white-tented seas

Until hollows chased the dimples from her cheeks of olive brown,
And at times a swift, shy moisture dragged the long sweet lashes down;

Or the small mouth curved and quivered as for some denied caress,
And the fair young brow was knitted in an infantine distress.

Then the grim Commander, pacing where the brazen cannon are,
Comforted the maid with proverbs, wisdom gathered from afar;

Bits of ancient observation by his fathers garnered, each
As a pebble worn and polished in the current of his speech: 

“‘Those who wait the coming rider travel twice as far as he;’
‘Tired wench and coming butter never did in time agree;’

“‘He that getteth himself honey, though a clown, he shall have flies;’
‘In the end God grinds the miller;’ ‘In the dark the mole has eyes;’

“‘He whose father is Alcalde of his trial hath no fear,’ —
And be sure the Count has reasons that will make his conduct clear.”

Then the voice sententious faltered, and the wisdom it would teach
Lost itself in fondest trifles of his soft Castilian speech;

And on “Concha,” “Conchitita,” and “Conchita” he would dwell
With the fond reiteration which the Spaniard knows so well.

So with proverbs and caresses, half in faith and half in doubt,
Every day some hope was kindled, flickered, faded, and went out.

IV.

Yearly, down the hillside sweeping, came the stately cavalcade,
Bringing revel to vaquero, joy and comfort to each maid;

Bringing days of formal visit, social feast and rustic sport,
Of bull-baiting on the plaza, of love-making in the court.

Vainly then at Concha’s lattice, vainly as the idle wind,
Rose the thin high Spanish tenor that bespoke the youth too kind;

Vainly, leaning from their saddles, caballeros, bold and fleet,
Plucked for her the buried chicken from beneath their mustang’s feet;

So in vain the barren hillsides with their gay serapes blazed, — Blazed and vanished in the dust-cloud that their flying hoofs had raised.

Then the drum called from the rampart, and once more, with patient mien,
The Commander and his daughter each took up the dull routine,

Each took up the petty duties of a life apart and lone,
Till the slow years wrought a music in its dreary monotone.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
California Romantic and Resourceful; : a plea for the collection, preservation and diffusion of information relating to Pacific coast history from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook