Hazard of New Fortunes, a — Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 489 pages of information about Hazard of New Fortunes, a Complete.

His behavior, from a man born to the joking give and take of our life, impressed March.  It gave him a fine sense of the ferocity which he had read of the French troops putting on toward the populace just before the coup d’etat; he began to feel like the populace; but he struggled with himself and regained his character of philosophical observer.  In this character he remained in the car and let it carry him by the corner where he ought to have got out and gone home, and let it keep on with him to one of the farthermost tracks westward, where so much of the fighting was reported to have taken place.  But everything on the way was as quiet as on the East Side.

Suddenly the car stopped with so quick a turn of the brake that he was half thrown from his seat, and the policeman jumped down from the platform and ran forward.

IV

Dryfoos sat at breakfast that morning with Mrs. Mandel as usual to pour out his coffee.  Conrad had gone down-town; the two girls lay abed much later than their father breakfasted, and their mother had gradually grown too feeble to come down till lunch.  Suddenly Christine appeared at the door.  Her face was white to the edges of her lips, and her eyes were blazing.

“Look here, father!  Have you been saying anything to Mr. Beaton?”

The old man looked up at her across his coffee-cup through his frowning brows.  “No.”

Mrs. Mandel dropped her eyes, and the spoon shook in her hand.

“Then what’s the reason he don’t come here any more?” demanded the girl; and her glance darted from her father to Mrs. Mandel.  “Oh, it’s you, is it?  I’d like to know who told you to meddle in other people’s business?”

“I did,” said Dryfoos, savagely.  “I told her to ask him what he wanted here, and he said he didn’t want anything, and he stopped coming.  That’s all.  I did it myself.”

“Oh, you did, did you?” said the girl, scarcely less insolently than she had spoken to Mrs. Mandel.  “I should like to know what you did it for?  I’d like to know what made you think I wasn’t able to take care of myself.  I just knew somebody had been meddling, but I didn’t suppose it was you.  I can manage my own affairs in my own way, if you please, and I’ll thank you after this to leave me to myself in what don’t concern you.”

“Don’t concern me?  You impudent jade!” her father began.

Christine advanced from the doorway toward the table; she had her hands closed upon what seemed trinkets, some of which glittered and dangled from them.  She said, “Will you go to him and tell him that this meddlesome minx, here, had no business to say anything about me to him, and you take it all back?”

“No!” shouted the old man.  “And if—­”

“That’s all I want of you!” the girl shouted in her turn.  “Here are your presents.”  With both hands she flung the jewels-pins and rings and earrings and bracelets—­among the breakfast-dishes, from which some of them sprang to the floor.  She stood a moment to pull the intaglio ring from the finger where Beaton put it a year ago, and dashed that at her father’s plate.  Then she whirled out of the room, and they heard her running up-stairs.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Hazard of New Fortunes, a — Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook