Unknown to History: a story of the captivity of Mary of Scotland eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 496 pages of information about Unknown to History.

UNKNOWN TO HISTORY.

Poor scape-goat of crimes, where,—­her part what it may,
So tortured, so hunted to die,
Foul age of deceit and of hate,—­on her head
Least stains of gore-guiltiness lie;
To the hearts of the just her blood from the dust
Not in vain for mercy will cry.

Poor scape-goat of nations and faiths in their strife
So cruel,—­and thou so fair! 
Poor girl!—­so, best, in her misery named,—­
Discrown’d of two kingdoms, and bare;
Not first nor last on this one was cast
The burden that others should share. 
                 Visions of England, by F. T. Palgrave

CHAPTER I. THE LITTLE WAIF.

On a spring day, in the year 1568, Mistress Talbot sat in her lodging at Hull, an upper chamber, with a large latticed window, glazed with the circle and diamond leading perpetuated in Dutch pictures, and opening on a carved balcony, whence, had she been so minded, she could have shaken hands with her opposite neighbour.  There was a richly carved mantel-piece, with a sea-coal fire burning in it, for though it was May, the sea winds blew cold, and there was a fishy odour about the town, such as it was well to counteract.  The floor was of slippery polished oak, the walls hung with leather, gilded in some places and depending from cornices, whose ornaments proved to an initiated eye, that this had once been the refectory of a small priory, or cell, broken up at the Reformation.

Of furniture there was not much, only an open cupboard, displaying two silver cups and tankards, a sauce-pan of the same metal, a few tall, slender, Venetian glasses, a little pewter, and some rare shells.  A few high-backed chairs were ranged against the wall; there was a tall “armory,” i.e. a linen-press of dark oak, guarded on each side by the twisted weapons of the sea unicorn, and in the middle of the room stood a large, solid-looking table, adorned with a brown earthenware beau-pot, containing a stiff posy of roses, southernwood, gillyflowers, pinks and pansies, of small dimensions.  On hooks, against the wall, hung a pair of spurs, a shield, a breastplate, and other pieces of armour, with an open helmet bearing the dog, the well-known crest of the Talbots of the Shrewsbury line.

On the polished floor, near the window, were a child’s cart, a little boat, some whelks and limpets.  Their owner, a stout boy of three years old, in a tight, borderless, round cap, and home-spun, madder-dyed frock, lay fast asleep in a big wooden cradle, scarcely large enough, however, to contain him, as he lay curled up, sucking his thumb, and hugging to his breast the soft fragment of a sea-bird’s downy breast.  If he stirred, his mother’s foot was on the rocker, as she sat spinning, but her spindle danced languidly on the floor, as if “feeble was her hand, and silly her thread;” while she listened anxiously, for every sound in the street below.  She wore a dark blue dress, with a small lace ruff opening in front, deep cuffs to match, and a white apron likewise edged with lace, and a coif, bent down in the centre, over a sweet countenance, matronly, though youthful, and now full of wistful expectancy; not untinged with anxiety and sorrow.

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Unknown to History: a story of the captivity of Mary of Scotland from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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